bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
of any formal programme, and given that many practising bioethicists may not even be able to engage in further specialised studies, the least we can perhaps hope for is ongoing personal study in the areas I have mentioned above.
During the q and a, almost all the bioethicists who asked questions contested my view that professional groups Linage their credibility when they pronounce on issues outside of their expertise.
The bioethicists who feel that the Houston man "cut in the ling" have an alternative concept of how to deal with precious healthcare resources.
Alta Charo, a legal scholar and bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin, "If the questions you ask and the science you do really challenges or explores cultural or religious or political norms .
Consistently with the views of some Catholic bioethicists, these hospitals have regarded artificial feeding as an "extraordinary means of life-support" and therefore as something that they are not obligated to provide.
Bioethicists have argued in a few academic journals that Companion is another step in the depersonalization of medicine.
The work is unparalleled: 52 essays by Spain's most prominent moralists, bioethicists, and interested physicians.
Today, due in large part to vigorous advocacy by bioethicists, which in turn has led to court cases and then to new laws permitting the practice, it is routine in nursing homes and hospitals throughout the country.
Bioethicists, however, have their own explanation, according to Evans, for the thinness (formalism, formal rationality) of the contemporary debate on HGE.
Barnabas, a New Jersey fertility clinic, set off alarm bells among bioethicists with the publication of a paper detailing the genetic condition of two the 17 cytoplasmic-transfer babies born through the clinic to date.
Bioethicists increasingly find their work underwritten by pharmaceutical companies.