bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(6) The fixed notion of scarcity, along with bioethicists' endorsement of the idea that the lifeboat metaphor represents medical reality, has led to repeated, virtually endless bioethics discussions on the treatment (or non-treatment) of patients with limited prognoses as a "necessity" argument to amplify the need to ration.
Given the limits-time, resources, costs, etc.--of any formal programme, and given that many practising bioethicists may not even be able to engage in further specialised studies, the least we can perhaps hope for is ongoing personal study in the areas I have mentioned above.
For many bioethicists, the answer to this question would be "none." My students and I came to a different conclusion.
During the q and a, almost all the bioethicists who asked questions contested my view that professional groups Linage their credibility when they pronounce on issues outside of their expertise.
I'll do so in the context of asking readers to consider two very similar case scenarios from clinical bioethics that were developed by a bioethicist from the United Kingdom, Raanan Gillon.
Theological bioethicists have at their disposal the parables, narratives, metaphors, images, words, concepts and emotions to gather together a wide variety of truly compassionate collaborators who share their concerns about social justice.
Immediately after the appointments were announced last March, more than 200 of the country's leading bioethicists signed an open letter to the President expressing concern that the credibility of the council had been "severely compromised."
The bioethicists who feel that the Houston man "cut in the ling" have an alternative concept of how to deal with precious healthcare resources.
Alta Charo, a legal scholar and bioethicist at the University of Wisconsin, "If the questions you ask and the science you do really challenges or explores cultural or religious or political norms ...
Freiden, commissioner, New York City Department of Health; Matthew Wynia, director of the Institute of Ethics of the American Medical Association; Kenyan bioethicist Angela Wassuna, associate for International Affairs of the Hastings Center; and 19 other bioethicists and health professionals.
Consistently with the views of some Catholic bioethicists, these hospitals have regarded artificial feeding as an "extraordinary means of life-support" and therefore as something that they are not obligated to provide.
Bioethicists have argued in a few academic journals that Companion is another step in the depersonalization of medicine.