bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).
References in periodicals archive ?
If scarcity is inevitable, then rationing is required, "if some are to be saved." Bioethicists have developed complex metrics, analyses, and budgeting programs to determine, in an "ethical manner," how decision-makers "must set priorities among competing opportunities." (7) The bioethical selection process for allocating scarce resources designates those patients who may best profit from them, and de-selects those who cannot profit, or simply cannot be saved.
While hovering above the fray the bioethicist objectively delineates value conflicts, lays out the assumptions behind different positions, evaluates the soundness of arguments according to standard rules of logic, and reflects upon the potential consequences of various courses of action.
It is hard to fathom what consequences would confirm a bioethicist's recommendations for stem-cell research."
"The statement that consent has been obtained has little meaning unless the subject or his guardian is capable of understanding what is to be undertaken and unless all hazards are made clear," wrote bioethicist and former Harvard Medical School professor Henry Beecher in an essay, Ethics and Clinical Research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1966.
Framing ethical questions has passed from the physician to the bioethicist, medically trained or not, and falls into two broad categories: what decision is "needed," and who should make the decision.
There is little doubt that TNT is getting the following pitch based on the eldest Emanuel brother, oncologist and bioethicist Ezekiel, or "Zeke."
ARTHUR CAPLAN, a bioethicist at the University of Pennsylvania, is against legalizing the sale of kidneys because "the only people who would sell are the poor people," an argument frequently made by opponents of opening up organ markets.
But there is every reason to doubt that the numbers they compiled will be sufficient to overturn a medical practice that carries so much ethical weight for women."--UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BIOETHICIST ARTHUR CAPLAN IN A COMMENTARY POSTED ONLINE NOVEMBER 19 ON MSNBC'S WEBSITE ON THE DEBATE OVER WHEN WOMEN SHOULD BEGIN REGULAR MAMMOGRAM TESTING
Kass invited bioethicist Daniel Callahan to argue the matter with him before the president but, unbeknownst to Kass, Callahan had since grown opposed to stem cell research altogether.
Bioethicist Richard Sharp, of the Baylor College of Medicine, introduces the mini-monograph with an overview of the myriad ethical and social issues that arise in environmental health science, from the choice of which toxicants to study, to the interpretation of data, to the communication of results to the public.
A recent study conducted by University of Massachusetts public health professor Dorothy Wertz and University of Virginia bioethicist John Fletcher revealed that 62 percent of American geneticists would agree to perform sex-selection tests on fetuses (or refer them to specialists who would) for parents who stated ahead of time their desire to have an abortion if the fetus was the "wrong" sex.
Michael Williams, MD, a bioethicist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, told the panel that it is impossible to make a decision without having data that only can be provided by a demonstration project.