bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparative data regarding the nephrological information on the differences and inequalities in access to RRT in the BRICS countries, as well as the main bioethical issues involved, are shown in Chart 1.
In the sixth instance, what is the implication of Article 9 as universal bioethical principle and human right?
The HSCT Team requested an ethics consultation with the Bioethical Committee (BC) to obtain necessary help on deciding what to do about the donor age and how to support family decision [21].
While these are discussed in personal terms, they throw light onto the broader challenges experienced by Christians in coming to terms with bioethical debate, challenges to which I return in the later sections.
In some situations reported in the interviews, it was found that the methodological approach of interdisciplinary debate enabled the academic one bioethical reflection space, enabling them to gain a better understanding of the complexity of the issues discussed, realizing that such questions involve different aspects and divide opinions.
Today, it is generally accepted that even patients whose physical and cognitive abilities are intact, are uniquely vulnerable in the bioethical environment because of the bigger expertise and social authority of the treating doctor.
(9) Staff members need to consider the bioethical standards of autonomy, freedom, objectivity, self-assertion, beneficence and fidelity, so the patient's individuality is respected.
A vast majority of the respondents were not satisfied with the state laws, policies, rules, regulations and institutions concerned with bioethical issues.
They reject the idea that there is a necessary and sufficient 'core' to bioethics, identifying four axis of bioethical difference: disciplinary; functional diversity; sub-fields and specialization; and moral pluralism.
The use of ART is anticipated to grow rapidly in Iran in the coming years, and this growth will bring about some very important bioethical issues to consider.
Many ingredients go into the melange: a rich stock of cultural and literary studies; two varieties of bioethics--narrative medicine and principlism; pinches of more than two dozen bioethical cases; about a dozen legal cases both fresh and aged; and another dozen resonating literary works with a heavy seasoning of fiction.