bioethics

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bioethics

 [bi″o-eth´iks]
the application of ethics to the biological sciences, medicine, nursing, and health care. The practical ethical questions raised in everyday health care are generally in the realm of bioethics.

bioethics

/bio·eth·ics/ (-eth´iks) obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

(bī′ō-ĕth′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study of the ethical and moral implications of new biological discoveries and biomedical advances, as in the fields of genetic engineering and drug research.

bi′o·eth′i·cal adj.
bi′o·eth′i·cist (-ĭ-sĭst) n.

bioethics

[bī′ō·eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life + ethos, the habits of humans or animals
obligations of a moral nature relating to biological research and its applications.

bioethics

An evolving, multidisciplinary—ethics, philosophy and sociology—field of allied health care, which examines the impact of life sciences on society.

Issues of bioethics
Doctor-patient relationships, medical decision making, futility of medical care in certain patient groups, healthcare rationing, patients’ rights, physician-assisted suicide, involvement in cases that require unbiased patient advocacy.

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics

The study of the ethical and moral questions arising from the growing possible application of biological and genetic knowledge, especially in BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING.

bioethics

a study of the ethical issues relating to biological, medical and other scientific research and applications. Bioethics considers the perceived risks and benefits of the technologies involved, and their impact on society The major principles on which ethical decision-making is based are: benevolence (doing good, acting in the best interests of an individual and of all, securing their well-being); non-maleficence (preventing harm); autonomy (acting in a way that maximizes freedom of choice for the individual); confidentiality (respecting privacy of information) and justice (treating all fairly, unless there are morally relevant differences between people).

bi·o·eth·ics

(bī'ō-eth'iks)
Branch of ethics dealing with the use of the human body or body tissue in medical procedures (i.e., organ and fetal tissue transplant).

bioethics,

n the study of social and moral issues raised in the field of biology, including medicine and dentistry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The comparative data regarding the nephrological information on the differences and inequalities in access to RRT in the BRICS countries, as well as the main bioethical issues involved, are shown in Chart 1.
In the sixth instance, what is the implication of Article 9 as universal bioethical principle and human right?
While these are discussed in personal terms, they throw light onto the broader challenges experienced by Christians in coming to terms with bioethical debate, challenges to which I return in the later sections.
This common sense idea is related to the bioethical principle of beneficence and has a theoretical foundation in utilitarian ethical theory.
The theory of symphonology also addresses the weaknesses inherent in the bioethical principles of utilitarianism and deontology.
There is little debate, if any, in the Pakistani print and electronic media on bioethical issues, except for occasional splashing of sensational news such as black market organ trade.
Cherry also deserves to be taken to task for suggesting that Fox and Swazey propose solving the bioethical culture wars through appeal to international human rights law.
Despite these criticisms, Holloway's encyclopedic collection of legal and bioethical cases, melded with captivating fiction and discriminating analyses, make this book nourishing sustenance for anyone who believes that bioethics has a way to go in understanding not only that race and gender matter but also how they matter.
Medical decision-making is guided by the four bioethical principles of respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice.
Rather than take on new issues, I believe bioethicists should rethink our approach to bioethical topics more generally.
VATICAN CITY * Controversies over bioethical standards at U.