bioengineering

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engineering

 [en″jĭ-nēr´ing]
the application of scientific and mathematical principles to useful ends, such as in the development of mechanical devices, systems, or processes.
biomedical engineering bioengineering.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·med·i·cal en·gi·neer·ing

application of engineering principles to obtain solutions to biomedical problems.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioengineering

(bī′ō-ĕn′jə-nîr′ĭng)
n.
1. The application of engineering principles and techniques to the field of biology, especially biomedicine, as in the development of prostheses, biomaterials, and medical devices and instruments. Also called biomedical engineering.
2. Genetic engineering.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioengineering

(1) The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues.
(2) A branch of civil engineering based on use of living plants for erosion control and landscape restoration.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioengineering

The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues. See Biomaterial.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bioengineering

See BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bioengineering

  1. the application of technological processes to the biological synthesis of compounds of economic and medical importance. See GENETIC ENGINEERING.
  2. the creation of artifical replacements for body parts.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Bioengineers have modified Deinococcus radiodurans--a bacterium with rapid DNA repair mechanisms enabling it to live in environments with very high levels of radioactive material--to consume and digest the hazardous chemicals in radioactive nuclear waste.
If all future safety and efficacy tests work out, it might be possible to try the first human implant of a Cornell bioengineered ear in as little as three years, he added.
The participants noted that the female bioengineers featured here cited the role of their parents or teachers in encouraging their pursuit of an engineering career.
North American sales of bioengineered crops are $200 million a year and growing.
Bioengineered soybeans exported to Europe met with strident protests by environmental groups earlier this year.
"Our approach is very efficient," notes Wan, who produced hundreds of bioengineered barley plants in only 7 months.
One of the first bioengineered foods is sweeter corn.
The bioengineering-based Engineering Research Centers consist of one each in bioengineered materials, bioprocess engineering, engineering of living tissue, computer integrated surgical systems, neuromorphic systems, biofilm engineering, and marine bioproducts engineering.
* Information and education for individual bioengineers and for patients among bioengineers and other working on health care teams.
In viewing the world through the lens of physics, bioengineers not only provide mechanical answers but also reveal the limits of purely biological answers.
"Our lab's research mission is to prevent falls and [fall-related] injuries in healthy and older adults," says Pittsburgh bioengineer Mark Redfern.
Drifting pollen may bring earlier pest resistance to bioengineered crops," SN: 5/15/04, p.