bioengineering


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engineering

 [en″jĭ-nēr´ing]
the application of scientific and mathematical principles to useful ends, such as in the development of mechanical devices, systems, or processes.
biomedical engineering bioengineering.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·med·i·cal en·gi·neer·ing

application of engineering principles to obtain solutions to biomedical problems.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioengineering

(bī′ō-ĕn′jə-nîr′ĭng)
n.
1. The application of engineering principles and techniques to the field of biology, especially biomedicine, as in the development of prostheses, biomaterials, and medical devices and instruments. Also called biomedical engineering.
2. Genetic engineering.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioengineering

(1) The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues.
(2) A branch of civil engineering based on use of living plants for erosion control and landscape restoration.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioengineering

The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues. See Biomaterial.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bioengineering

See BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

bioengineering

  1. the application of technological processes to the biological synthesis of compounds of economic and medical importance. See GENETIC ENGINEERING.
  2. the creation of artifical replacements for body parts.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Stephen Simpson, director of research and programmes at Arthritis Research UK, said: "We are convinced that the progress made by the Arthritis Research UK Biomechanics and Bioengineering Centre combined the dedication and ambition of its research teams has the potential to be transformative".
Other members of the team include James Allen, a University of Utah bioengineering graduate; Mitch Barneck, another bioengineering graduate of the University of Utah currently in medical school at Oregon Health and Science University; Martin de La Presa, a University of Utah student doctor; and Ahrash Poursaid, who received a bachelor's degree in bioengineering from the university this spring.
Bioengineering is not limited to microbial research; larger organisms may also offer mechanisms to catalyze energy generation.
IITB's faculty of Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering (DBSBE) will be affiliated to WRCBB to carry out their research.
The Bioengineering Institute receives funding through the military, primarily from
The Table contains 20 outstanding women in bioengineering and their major achievements.
To do this, she would use micromachining techniques similar to those for creating silicon computer chips, making her a rising star in the fields of bioengineering and nanotechnology.
When professors in the Faculty of Bioengineering at Rice University in Houston Texas found they needed a software package to help draw accurate chemical structures to place in publications and grant proposals for their work on glycosaminoglycans, they contacted ACD/Labs.
The Corps, in collaboration with the State of Vermont, constructed a shoreline stabilization project for 1,100 feet of reservoir shoreline this summer, using both traditional and bioengineering methods.
Alternative approaches relying on the stabilizing properties of vegetation, alternatively known as soil bioengineering (Schiechtl, 1996), biotechnical engineering (Gray and Sotir, 1996) and phytostabilization (Berti and Cunningham, 2000), have been known for many years (Gray and Leiser, 1989; Schiechtl, 1980).
Hui (an food industry consultant), Wai-Kit Nip (Food Technologist Emeritus, Department of Molecular Biosciences and Bioengineering, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii), Leo M.