bioengineering

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engineering

 [en″jĭ-nēr´ing]
the application of scientific and mathematical principles to useful ends, such as in the development of mechanical devices, systems, or processes.
biomedical engineering bioengineering.

bi·o·med·i·cal en·gi·neer·ing

application of engineering principles to obtain solutions to biomedical problems.

bioengineering

(bī′ō-ĕn′jə-nîr′ĭng)
n.
1. The application of engineering principles and techniques to the field of biology, especially biomedicine, as in the development of prostheses, biomaterials, and medical devices and instruments. Also called biomedical engineering.
2. Genetic engineering.

bioengineering

(1) The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues.
(2) A branch of civil engineering based on use of living plants for erosion control and landscape restoration.

bioengineering

The science of developing and manufacturing artificial replacements for organs, limbs and tissues. See Biomaterial.

bioengineering

See BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

bioengineering

  1. the application of technological processes to the biological synthesis of compounds of economic and medical importance. See GENETIC ENGINEERING.
  2. the creation of artifical replacements for body parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
764s Disclosure Mandate Applies to Bioengineered Foods, a Potentially Restrictive Definition: Section 292 of S.
reports the successful orthotopic transplantation of a bioengineered lacrimal gland germ into an adult extra-orbital lacrimal gland defect model mouse, which mimics the corneal epithelial damage caused by lacrimal gland dysfunction.
This study thus reveals the potential applications of adult tissue-derived follicular stem cells as a bioengineered organ replacement therapy, researchers said.
The bioengineered corn in question is grown mainly in Spain and to a lesser extent in Portugal, the Czech Republic, Poland, Slovakia and Romania.
Ronnie Cummins, the national director of the Organic Consumers Association, disagrees, saying that allergies are just one of the possible negative health effects of bioengineered food.
To date, biotechnology firms have completed consultation with FDA on more than 40 food products, and a substantial portion of American cropland is planted with bioengineered seeds.
The bioengineered medicines that now offer physicians new tools for fighting disease have been eagerly embraced.
Nonetheless, regulators have focused less on the safety of bioengineered foods than on the techniques behind them.
The situation is far different in Europe, where last November over-whelming consumer demand led the 15-country European Union to require all foods containing bioengineered organisms to be labeled.
Bioengineered food commodities that are either hitting the market or in late stages of development include soybeans, corn, tomatoes, potatoes and oilseeds.
According to FDA guidelines, a company can market bioengineered plant foods without approval or the need for special labeling.
A comprehensive assessment of the bioengineered wound care technologies and products for advanced wound management, this report provides a detailed analysis of twenty-two next-generation wound care products, including tissue-engineered skin substitutes, synthetic and harvested regeneration matrices, autologous grafts and biologically active cellular therapies.