biodynamics


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bi·o·dy·nam·ics

(bī'ō-dī-nam'iks),
The science dealing with the force or energy of living matter.
[bio- + G. dynamis, force]

biodynamics

(bī′ō-dī-năm′ĭks, -dĭ-)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
1. The scientific study of the effects of dynamic processes, such as motion or acceleration, on living organisms.
2.
a. The holistic study of the vital force or energy of living matter and physiological processes.
b. A holistic method of organic gardening and crop cultivation in which certain factors, such as planetary and seasonal cycles, are considered.

bi′o·dy·nam′ic adj.

biodynamics

[-dīnam′iks]
the study of the effects of dynamic processes, such as radiation, on organisms.

biodynamics

(1) The formal study of vital forces, physiological interactions and behaviours in living organisms.
(2) The study of the effects of physical changes and mechanics on biological systems.
(3) Biodynamic agriculture, see there.

biodynamics

The formal study of vital forces, physiological interactions and behavior

bi·o·dy·nam·ics

(bī'ō-dī-nam'iks)
The dynamic relationship existing between organisms, their physiology, and their environment.
[bio- + G. dynamis, force]

biodynamics

the scientific study of the nature and determinants of the behavior of all organisms, including humans.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Christian Hoyer Millar, CEO at Oxford BioDynamics, said, 'His considerable experience in business development within the sector will be a great asset to Oxford BioDynamics as we look to leverage IP licensing opportunities with our award-winning, proprietary technology platform EpiSwitch.
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus spores host bacteria that affect nutrient biodynamics and biocontrol of soil-borne plant pathogens.
Total space of land cultivated through biodynamic methods in Egypt is 7,000 feddans
The focus of the book is organics, but all other aspect of sustainability and the environment are also touched on and explained, including of course biodynamics and the natural wine movement.
At Escarpment this means a five-year programme which began by abandoning herbicides and will end by fully embracing the homeopathic sprays that typify biodynamics.
From biodynamics, to permaculture, to backyard gardening and today's organic agriculture, the practitioners of non-industrial and small scale agriculture saw their work as an 'extension and enhancement of political struggle' (p49).
Employment Professor, Department of Biodynamics, School of Physical Education and Sports, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
They were surprised to discover a common fantasy of growing fruit through a sustainable method called biodynamics, which builds the fertility of the soil with limited use of imported materials.
The Green Wine Summit, according to the event chair Lesley Berglund, featured leaders in sustainability, organics and biodynamics.
This comes from a therapist who offers students and practitioners a step-by-step guide to mastering the skills key to a biodynamic approach, and presents further developments in the field since the publication of his first textbook CRANIOSACRAL BIODYNAMICS.
It may all sound a bit bonkers but a significant number of winemakers are turning towards biodynamics in an attempt to create a self-regulating micro-environment, in harmony with the elements, which they claim makes better wine.