biodegradable

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biodegradable

 [bi″o-de-grād´ah-b'l]
susceptible of breakdown into simpler components by biological processes, as by bacterial or other enzymatic action.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dē-grād'ă-bil),
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (for example, weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biodegradable

(bī′ō-dĭ-grā′də-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being decomposed by biological agents, especially bacteria: a biodegradable detergent.

bi′o·de·grad′a·bil′i·ty n.
bi′o·deg′ra·da′tion (-dĕg′rə-dā′shən) n.
bi′o·de·grade′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance (e.g., an organic chemical) which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof—e.g., soil bacteria, weather, sunlight, plants or animals—to a simpler nontoxic form.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance–eg, a chemical, which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof–eg, soil bacteria, weather, plants or animals, to a simpler form
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
De-noting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012