biodegradable

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biodegradable

 [bi″o-de-grād´ah-b'l]
susceptible of breakdown into simpler components by biological processes, as by bacterial or other enzymatic action.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dē-grād'ă-bil),
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (for example, weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biodegradable

(bī′ō-dĭ-grā′də-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being decomposed by biological agents, especially bacteria: a biodegradable detergent.

bi′o·de·grad′a·bil′i·ty n.
bi′o·deg′ra·da′tion (-dĕg′rə-dā′shən) n.
bi′o·de·grade′ v.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance (e.g., an organic chemical) which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof—e.g., soil bacteria, weather, sunlight, plants or animals—to a simpler nontoxic form.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance–eg, a chemical, which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof–eg, soil bacteria, weather, plants or animals, to a simpler form
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
De-noting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Green-DEXT" (a Showa Best product) biodegrades in biologically active landfills thus providing an effective single-use hand protection solution as well as the ability to boost a company's green credentials and reduce its recycling costs.
Some people also claim that there is no evidence that oxo-bio plastic does biodegrade, but there is ample evidence in published scientific literature and in tests done according to international standards in Symphony's own laboratories and by independent test houses.
They don't biodegrade any faster than traditional plastic, but they don't end up in a landfill.
The most common type of plastic shopping bag is made of polyethylene, a petroleum-derived polymer that microorganisms don't recognize as food and as such cannot technically "biodegrade." The U.S.
The packaging is made of more than 90% polylactic acid (PLA), derived from corn, and is designed to completely biodegrade in a hot, active compost bin in 14 weeks.
By 2013 all plastic bags produced in the UAE will have to be made with this component marketed as being able to make plastic bags biodegrade without leaving residue or fragments behind.
When added to hot, active compost pile, the mechanically pulped bamboo material will biodegrade "a rate comparable to known compostable materials," according to a company press release.
But plastic takes a long time to biodegrade, or break down, and will stay floating in the ocean for many years.
Their search led them to the food industry and specifically to the FDA approved EcoPure, a recyclable, non-toxic resin additive that allows plastics to completely biodegrade in less than 1-5 years.
responded in a letter-to-the-editor of an American publication "the Bioplastics Council and its European counterpart are inherently biased against competing technologies and they have once again sought to discredit oxo-biodegradable plastics technology through their ongoing campaign of misinformation and rumor mongering." The squabble hinges on the fact that the additives cause plastics to fragment into small pieces rather than biodegrade. Part of Environmental Products Inc.'s counter-argument is that compostability and biodegradability aren't the same thing.
Certified as readily biodegradable, the chemicals biodegrade by more than 90% within 28 days--about 50% faster than comparable products.
The products are formulated with a nontoxic natural additive that allows the discarded plastic to become nutrient-rich food for microbes, allowing it to biodegrade.