biodegradable

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biodegradable

 [bi″o-de-grād´ah-b'l]
susceptible of breakdown into simpler components by biological processes, as by bacterial or other enzymatic action.

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dē-grād'ă-bil),
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (for example, weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).

biodegradable

/bio·de·grad·a·ble/ (-de-grād´ah-b'l) susceptible of degradation by biological processes, as by bacterial or other enzymatic action.

biodegradable

(bī′ō-dĭ-grā′də-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being decomposed by biological agents, especially bacteria: a biodegradable detergent.

bi′o·de·grad′a·bil′i·ty n.
bi′o·deg′ra·da′tion (-dĕg′rə-dā′shən) n.
bi′o·de·grade′ v.

biodegradable

[-digrā′dəbəl]
Etymology: Gk, bios, life; L, de, away, gradus, step
the natural ability of a chemical substance to be broken down into less complex compounds or compounds having fewer carbon atoms by bacteria or other microorganisms.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance (e.g., an organic chemical) which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof—e.g., soil bacteria, weather, sunlight, plants or animals—to a simpler nontoxic form.

biodegradable

adjective Referring to a substance–eg, a chemical, which is degradable by natural systems or components thereof–eg, soil bacteria, weather, plants or animals, to a simpler form

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
Denoting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).

bi·o·de·grad·a·ble

(bī'ō-dĕ-grād'ă-bĕl)
De-noting a substance that can be chemically degraded or decomposed by natural effectors (e.g., weather, soil bacteria, plants, animals).

biodegradable,

adj the ability to be broken down into smaller, harmless products by way of the action of living organisms.

biodegradable

susceptible to degradation by biological processes, as by bacterial or other enzymatic action.
References in periodicals archive ?
The phone covers also produce less mess: Since the covers biodegrade, they reduce the waste in landfills.
Last year, Langer and Lendlein reported the first polymer version that would biodegrade in the body.
The purpose of this project is to determine which detergent (Tide, Cheer or Gain) will biodegrade the fastest over time.
The remaining five per cent is left in the forest to biodegrade and provide nutrients to support new growth.
Hotchkiss also had worked closely with Archer Daniels Midland (ADM), the agricultural products conglomerate whose corn starch additive made the plastic biodegrade.
Now consumers can recycle like they always have, but if an empty BIO BOTTLE ends up in a landfill it will biodegrade naturally, like any other organic matter.
It is also known that adding nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer to oil-contaminated soil can speed the growth of bacteria that decompose, or biodegrade, oil.
The sheet meets ASTM D6400 compostability standards and is designed to biodegrade quickly without leaving any plastic residue in commercial and municipal composts.
On average, there are 24,000 plastic items in each square mile of sea; plastic bags take up to 1,000 years to biodegrade.
Previous 'green' plastics came under scrutiny based on whether or not a plastic can fully biodegrade and be absorbed by microorganisms.
Plastics never biodegrade, so please think about how you dispose of your litter and reduce, reuse and recycle as much as possible," she said.