biodefense

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biodefense

(bī″ō-dĕ-fĕns′) [″ + ″]
National or international efforts to prevent the spread of biologically destructive agents, esp. when they are used in terrorism or warfare.
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"In other words, the biodefence research in Kenema was conducted in a high-risk, largely unprotected environment.
This had the major disadvantage that biological weapons were seen as similar in mode of operation and in terms of biodefence. Smith provides considerable detail on this point and, particularly, why this inhibited the provision of effective means of protection against such agents.
Despite the ready availability of DNA microarrays for use with different animal species, relatively few in vivo transcription studies have been published using models of infection with biodefence infectious agents compared with public health pathogens such as tuberculosis (TB) or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
Key opportunities exist in molecular reagent kits production and rapid biodefence tests for nerve agents and other biothreat agents.
The SBIR grants awarded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health and the US Army will fund advancements in the Ibis T5000 Biosensor System for new biodefence applications, including the detection and identification of infectious agents within the military blood supply.
The underlying reason, it is surmised, was that the lucrative us biotechnology industry, unlike the us chemical industry, did not want to be burdened with the cost and trouble of verification and the risk, however slight, of espionage, while the us Defense Department did not want international scrutiny of its biodefence programs, which skirt close to the ban on the production of biological weapons agents, if not actually contravening it.
A new book claims that a biodefence lab in Alberta, Canada was a prime target for Russian spies.
We entered several government contracts to develop new biodefence products and we expanded our distribution agreements.
Addressing the future of biodefence and the necessary response from the legal community, Sutton highlights the legal issues surrounding the First Amendment to the United States Constitution (84) and restrictions on biological weapons information, (85) laboratory security, (86) and vaccines and immunities.
The projects include Biodefence designed to develop a completely new mechanism of rapid immunisation against bio-terrorist weapons, using transformed GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) organisms.