biocide


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biocide

(bī′ə-sīd′)
n.
A chemical agent, such as a pesticide, that is capable of destroying living organisms.

bi′o·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biocide

A generic term for any chemical, substance or microbe which is toxic to living systems—e.g., plants (herbicide) or animals (pesticide).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·cide

(bī'ō-sīd)
A compound capable of killing something living.
[bio- + -cide]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biocide

see SYSTEMIC BIOCIDE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The manufacturing, creation, and production of biocides are regulated by the EPA.
Tougher legislation is also hampering the development of new biocides whose antibacterial properties help to combat microorganisms in formulations, particularly of waterborne coatings.
For Any Query on the Biocide Market: https://adroitmarketresearch.com/contacts/enquiry-before-buying/438 About US: Adroit Market Research is an India-based business analytics and consulting company.
Water for redispersing the paints is not added until just prior to application, thus eliminating the need for adding biocides during production.
While it is possible that [sup.14]C measured in the aliquots of solution could be microbial metabolites of the added glucose, we consider this unlikely because in the control treatments (no biocide), [sup.14]C activity in the solution reduced sharply soon after commencement of the experiment.
Although this biocide has broad antimicrobial activity and has been extensively studied, its full mechanism of action has not yet been confirmed (37,38).
The ACS GCI Hydraulic Fracturing Roundtable is seeking to facilitate academic research on enzymatic alternatives to biocides by partnering with scientific funding agencies and academic researchers.
The current strategies using chemical biocides to kill the SRB have shown great success [9].
In addition, improper use of biocides can lead to development of resistant bacteria, much like improper use of medical antibiotics.