biochrome


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nat·u·ral pig·ment

a naturally occurring colored compound; absorbs light in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Compare: structural color.
Synonym(s): biochrome
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biochrome

A generic term for any naturally produced or occurring pigment.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
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The cell pellet was resuspended in 1 mL RPMI 1640 medium (BioChrome, Berlin, Germany) and supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (Seromed, Berlin, Germany); the number of living cells was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method.
The turbidity of the playa water was measured at wavelength 650 nm by a LKB Biochrome spectrophotometer, model 4050 (Cambridge, England).
The cells were maintained in RPMI-1640 (FG1385, Biochrom) media with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) (S0115, Biochrome) and 10 [micro]g/ml gentamicin (A2712, Biochrome).
Louis, MO) and UV/visible spectrophotometer (LKB Novaspec 4049; LKB Biochrome, Cambridge, England).
Biological coloration results either from biochromes, which are true pigments that selectively absorb specific wavelengths of visible light, or from schemochromes, consisting of structures that reflect specific wavelengths as a result of the scattering of incident light or interference within the structure (Fox, 1976).
Biochromes produce the magic--they're the microscopic natural pigments that are produced chemically in the animal's cells.
It was commonly recognized that the red, orange, and yellow coloring in birds, plants, and fish was chemically tied to biochromes, like cartenoids--a class of natural fat-soluble pigments found in plants, algae, and photosynthetic bacteria.