biochip

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biochip

(bī′ō-chĭp′)
n.
1. An array of miniaturized chemical or biological test sites that is arranged on a substrate so that many tests can be performed simultaneously and that is used to sequence genes, analyze proteins, and identify toxins.
2. A computer chip made from organic molecules rather than semiconductors.

biochip

A microscale system for bioanalysis based on integrated circuit technology.
 
Examples
Molecular microarrays—gene chips, protein chips, small molecule chips; microfluidics systems—lab-on-a-chip; fibre-optic-based arrays.

biochip

see DNA CHIP.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And so after moving back to Egypt for good, Ismail began looking toward a future where people all over the world can be correctly diagnosed by placing a drop of blood on a biochip.
North America dominates the global biochips market owing to large number of aging population and broad technical applications of biochips followed by Europe and Asia-Pacific.
A biochip is an example of a bio-microsystem; it is a collection of microarrays organized on a solid substrate, allowing thousands of complex biochemical reactions, including decoding genes, in less time.
We have developed a biochip platform to identify the biomarkers for prostate cancer.
Their results showed that the specially designed biochip could detect glucose levels similar to the levels found in human saliva.
After pretreatment, biochips underwent a silanation activation process, and then an additional reaction with a bifunctional linker was performed when dictated by the immobilized biomolecule.
The tool, which will manufacture biochip components used in high-throughput, massively parallel protein analysis systems, was selected by Zyomyx based on superior process results, versatile process flexibility, and on Tegal's reputation for outstanding customer support.
Biochips are valuable tools for use in identifying and determining the roles of genes, gene mutations, and gene products (proteins) by vastly increasing the number of genes that can be studied in a single experiment.
In the in vitro diagnostics realm, biochips will begin to supplement and, in some cases, replace current approaches to detecting the presence of disease due to biochips' advantages in speed and accuracy.
Biomedical Photometrics, based in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, is experienced in developing state-of-the-art readers for genetic arrays and biochips based on proprietary confocal laser imaging technology.
Biochips can analyze biological reactions in seconds, and the right antibiotic can be prescribed for an individual TB strain, saving time and money.
Various applications of biochips and microarrays are described throughout the report.