biochemical pharmacology


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bi·o·chem·i·cal phar·ma·col·o·gy

a branch of pharmacology concerned with the biochemical mechanisms responsible for the actions of drugs.
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Krishnan, "Targeting inflammatory pathways for tumor radiosensitization," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Klaassen, "Oleanolic acid activates Nrf2 and protects from acetaminophen hepatotoxicity via Nrf2-dependent and Nrf2-independent processes," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Shaw, "Cocaine-induced hepatic necrosis in mice--the role of cocaine metabolism," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Kunnumakkara et al., "Biological activities of curcumin and its analogues (Congeners) made by man and Mother Nature," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Bartosz, "Reactive oxygen species: destroyers or messengers?" Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Barnes et al., "Stereoselective urinary MDMA (ecstasy) and metabolites excretion kinetics following controlled MDMA administration to humans," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Yamazoe, "Constitutive androstane receptor transcriptionally activates human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 genes through a common regulatory element in the 5'-flanking region," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
He is currently an associate chief physician and the director of the Biochemical Pharmacology Research Institute.
Pflieger et al., "Importance of hepatic metabolism in the antiaggregating activity of the thienopyridine clopidogrel," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Fonnum, "Evaluation of the probes 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, luminol, and lucigenin as indicators of reactive species formation," Biochemical Pharmacology, vol.
Boobis, a professor of biochemical pharmacology, and director of the Public Health England Toxicology Unit at Imperial College London, explains that the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Boobis, a professor of biochemical pharmacology, and director of the Public Health England Toxicology Unit at Imperial College London, explains that the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs), a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from certain chemicals, which became effective in 2004, means that "very few chemicals in use today accumulate in the body".
"Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression and enzyme activity by epigallocatechin gallate, a natural product from green tea." Biochemical Pharmacology. 12: 1281-6 (1997): Print.

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