biochemical genetics


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genetics

 [jĕ-net´iks]
the branch of biology dealing with the phenomena of heredity and the laws governing it.
biochemical genetics the study of the fundamental relationships between genes, protein, and metabolism. This involves the study of the cause of many specific heritable diseases. These include those resulting from the improper synthesis of hemoglobins and protein, such as sickle cell disease and thalassemia, both of which are hereditary anemias; some 200 inborn errors of metabolism, such as phenylketonuria and galactosemia, in which lack or alteration of a specific enzyme prohibits proper metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, or fats and thus produces pathologic symptoms; and genetically determined variations in response to certain drugs, for example, isoniazid.
clinical genetics the study of the causes and inheritance of genetic disorders. In addition to the diseases mentioned under biochemical genetics, other aspects of clinical genetics include the study of chromosomal aberrations, such as those that cause mental retardation and down syndrome, and immunogenetics, or the genetic aspects of the immune response and the transmission of genetic factors from generation to generation.

Many pediatric hospital admissions involve genetic disorders. In obstetrics and neonatal medicine, prenatal diagnosis of genetic defects and improvement of pre- and perinatal conditions are a major concern. In adults, such diseases as breast cancer, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus have all been found to have predisposing genetic components that are relevant to identification of risk factors and early diagnosis.

bi·o·chem·i·cal ge·net·ics

the study of genetics in terms of the chemical (biochemical) events involved, as in the manner in which DNA molecules replicate and control the synthesis of specific enzymes by the genetic code.

biochemical genetics

genetics

the branch of biology dealing with the phenomena of heredity and the laws governing it. Expressed in other definitions, e.g. population genetics.

biochemical genetics
the science concerned with the chemical and physical nature of genes and the mechanism by which they control the development and maintenance of the organism.
The field of biochemical or molecular genetics is relatively new and is increasingly used to define the cause of many inherited diseases. These diseases usually result from defective protein synthesis, such as hemophilia A and immunodeficiency, and more than 200 so-called 'inborn errors' of metabolism identified thus far in animals, such as mannosidosis and galactosemia, in which lack or alteration of a specific enzyme prohibits proper metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins or fats and thus produces clinical signs.
clinical genetics
the study of the possible genetic factors influencing the occurrence of a pathological condition. In addition to the diseases mentioned under biochemical genetics, other aspects of clinical genetics include the study of chromosomal aberrations, such as those that cause testicular hypoplasia, and immunogenetics, or the genetic aspects of the immune response and the transmission of genetic factors from generation to generation.
molecular genetics
the study of the molecular structure of genes, involving DNA and RNA. See also deoxyribonucleic acid.
References in periodicals archive ?
You have been working in the domain of biochemical genetics.
For the developmental programmes biochemical genetics permits the evaluation of the degree of homozygosity and the genetic similarity of populations making designed crossings more likely to be productive.
1] Biochemical Genetics Laboratory, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.
Breslow, head of the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism, says that this study brings a new level of understanding to an enzyme called HMGCR, the rate-limiting catalytic engine of cholesterol biosynthesis and the target of the much-revered cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins.
Updates to this edition include new chapters on biochemical genetics, the embryonic definition of body pattern, and ethical and social issues, along with 10 case studies.
Enns, director of the biochemical genetics program at Stanford (Calif.
Breslow, director of the Laboratory of Biochemical Genetics and Metabolism at Rockefeller University Hospital in New York.
Replacing Dean's liver is a perfect example of "gene therapy with a scalpel," said Gregory Enns, MB, ChB, director of the biochemical genetics program at Packard Children's.
4, 2002, there were 94 people enrolled in clinical genetics training programs and 0nly 14 enrolled in clinical biochemical genetics training programs.
Following his postdoctoral training in the laboratory of biochemical genetics at the National Institutes of Health, Dr.
Biochemical Genetics Laboratory, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN
When a car engine doesn't work right, it smokes," said senior study author Greg Enns, MB, ChB, who is professor of pediatrics at Stanford University School of Medicine and director of the biochemical genetics program at Packard.

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