biocatalyst

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bi·o·cat·a·lyst

(bī'ō-kat'ă-list),
A substance of biologic origin that can catalyze a reaction, for example, an enzyme.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biocatalyst

(bī′ō-kăt′l-ĭst)
n.
A substance, especially an enzyme, that initiates or modifies the rate of a chemical reaction in a living body; a biochemical catalyst.

bi′o·cat′a·lyt′ic (-kăt′l-ĭt′ĭk) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

biocatalyst

Any substance, typically an enzyme, to start, modify or maintain a chemical reaction in a living system.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

biocatalyst

(bī-ō-kăt′ă-lĭst) [″ + katalyein, to dissolve]
An enzyme; a biochemical catalyzer.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pharmaceutical scientists developing a drug with a biocatalytic route often start with an existing enzyme.
Beasleyet al., "Biocatalytic strategy toward asymmetric [beta]-hydroxy nitriles and [gamma]-amino alcohols," Tetrahedron Letters, vol.
Polyvalent metals such as iron can form very stable complexes by binding to multiple functional groups on one dissolved organic matter molecule and are perhaps the most versatile of the biocatalytic elements (Peretyazhko & Sposito, 2006).
"We were particularly interested in the biocatalytic process that leads up to the final compound," said Prof.
Soil-based gene discovery: A new technology to accelerate and broaden biocatalytic applications.
Catalytic and biocatalytic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid in a modified three phase reactor.
The patenting of research tools, protein design algorithms, and biocatalytic processes, for example, are all frequently approached via process claims that embody, explicitly or otherwise, some manifestation of nature.
In some cases traditional organic/inorganic catalysts or stoichiometric reactions could be replaced by biocatalytic (or enzymatic) routes, which offer environmental benefits.
Ultrasensitive aptamer-based protein detection via a dual amplified biocatalytic strategy.