biobehavioral


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biobehavioral

(bī′ō-bĭ-hāv′yə-rəl)
adj.
Of or relating to the relationships among behavioral, psychosocial, and biological processes, as in the progression or treatment of a disease.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They discuss all aspects of a biobehavioral assessment and the treatment models available, including how to make the right choice--generally a combination of cognitive and behavior therapy and pharmacotherapy.
Craske, who also is a professor of psychology and of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA.
Instead, new studies led by Gallup suggest, a yawn may be a thermostat, cooling an overheated brain, a position he argues in the January Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews.
The study will be led by Steven Shoptaw, Principal Investigator and Professor of Family Medicine and Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, and colleagues at UCLA who are established clinical research investigators in the treatment of drug addiction.
Jennifer Graham, Assistant Professor of Biobehavioral Health at Penn State University, said: "Previous research has shown that couples who are hostile to each other show health impairments and are at greater risk of disease.
Emslie has received research support from Biobehavioral Diagnostics Inc.
Craske (Department of Psychology and Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA) informatively addresses this widely practiced form of therapy with respect to its history, theoretical concepts and applications arising from discoveries with respect to classical and instrumental conditioning.
Future studies, she said, will focus on such key issues as the biobehavioral mechanisms involved in the link between persistent anxiety/depression and mortality, identification of subgroups at particularly high risk, optimal treatment options, and how to make treatments more acceptable to patients.
Lori Francis, assistant professor of biobehavioral health and first author of the recently published paper on the study, "The study shows that TV viewing can either increase or decrease preschool children's food intakes and suggests that when children consistently view TV during meals, TV viewing may distract children from normal fullness cues which can lead to overeating in children as it may in adults."
Cook and his associates at the department of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at the University of California, Los Angeles (Am.
This research was supported by the National Institute of Nursing Research and the University of Washington School of Nursing Biobehavioral Nursing Training Grant #5 T32 NR007106-04.