bioavailability

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bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

/bio·avail·a·bil·i·ty/ (bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te) the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.

bioavailability

[-əvā′libil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + ME, availen, to serve
the degree of activity or amount of an administered drug or other substance that becomes available for activity in the target tissue.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs

bioavailability

physiological availability of a given amount of drug

bioavailability (bīˈ·ō··vālˈ··bilˑ·i·tē),

n the amount of or rate at which a substance or drug is accessible to the body.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.

bioavailability

the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paradoxically, scientists suggest that large scale industry in countries like China could be combating global warming to some extent by creating more bioavailable iron in the oceans, and therefore increasing carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere.
The main hormone measurements of interest in the investigation included serum total testosterone as well as estimated bioavailable and free testosterone levels, which were calculated from serum total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and albumin concentrations.
Unlike the platinum drugs currently on the market, all of which require intravenous administration, satraplatin is an orally bioavailable compound and is given as capsules that patients can take at home.
The new products include GADOMAG+ (a citrate based magnesium supplement for food and beverage fortification), GADOCAL+ (a soluble calcium source) and GADOZINC+ (a bioavailable zinc source).
The researchers acknowledge that smaller particles tend to penetrate better than larger particles and possibly are more bioavailable, due to their higher surface-to-volume ratio.
It has become increasingly clear that the once-widespread impression that NAC is not orally bioavailable is incorrect.
Human clinical studies have shown that the Bio-Solv process used in the Q-Gel formulation makes CoQ10 several times more bioavailable than conventional supplement forms.
there is no doubt that these [anticancer] citrus compounds are bioavailable in animals to the site of a cancer.
Particulate P constitutes a variable but long-term source of potentially bioavailable particulate P (i.