bioavailability

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bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Subjects were assigned to receive bioavailable curcumin 90 mg twice daily (Theracurmin[R]) or placebo for 18 months.
The FAI can be considered an estimate of the bioavailable hormone.
An innovative approach to estimate bioavailable phosphorus in agricultural runoff using iron oxide-impregnated paper.
The ARS team's findings are telling us how many of those calories are bioavailable.
Qualitas says it has created the first global algae-based products platform to deliver vegan, highly bioavailable nutritional products with full traceability.
The new Coromega Max in Citrus Burst and Coconut Bliss flavors deliver 2,400 mg of omega-3 per dose plus 2,000 IL) vitamin D3 .The fish oil droplets in Coromega's emulsified formulas are smaller and more bioavailable, making them easier to digest and absorb omega-3s, and allow for faster passage into the digestive tract.
The acquisition is part of the company's plan to combine this enhanced bioavailable nutrient and the natural symbiotic immune system developed by Van Pham, an agricultural expert, for premium organic farming.
Some of the other biomarkers on the vitamin D pathway of potential clinical importance include fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), vitamin D binding protein (VDBP), free 25(OH)D, bioavailable 25(OH)D, parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium and phosphorus.
Coral LLC, Carson City, NV, has launched Daily Vitamin D3, sourced from above-sea EcoSafe coral, to deliver 5,000 IU of D3, along with 100 mg of bioavailable coral calcium, magnesium and 72 other minerals.
In the population-based Rotterdam Study, we investigated the association of levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and total and bioavailable testosterone with aortic atherosclerosis among 1,032 nonsmoking men and women aged 55 yr and over.
When it comes to vitamin and mineral supplementation, yeast represents a highly valuable source of safe and bioavailable essential minerals, such as selenium and zinc, coupled with a natural reservoir of proteins, fibres and other essential nutrients.
"This could be a very important discovery because there's only a very small amount of soluble iron in the ocean and if plankton use the iron nanoparticles formed in clouds then the whole flux of bioavailable iron to the oceans needs to be revised," said Dr Zongbo Shi, lead author of the research from the School of Earth and Environment at the University of Leeds.