bioavailability


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bioavailability

 [bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te]
the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē),
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that is absorbed into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

/bio·avail·a·bil·i·ty/ (bi″o-ah-vāl″ah-bil´ĭ-te) the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.

bioavailability

(bī′ō-ə-vā′lə-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n.
The degree to which or rate at which a drug or other substance is absorbed or becomes available at the site of physiological activity after administration.

bi′o·a·vail′a·ble (-lə-bəl) adj.

bioavailability

[-əvā′libil′itē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + ME, availen, to serve
the degree of activity or amount of an administered drug or other substance that becomes available for activity in the target tissue.

bioavailability

The rate and extent to which a drug is available to serve as a substrate, bind to a specific molecule or participate in biochemical reactions in a target tissue after administration. For oral agents, bioavailability reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption.

Bioavailability depends on the pI (isoelectric point), the pH of a solution in which the solute does not migrate (ionic form), presence of side chains or the conformation of the epitope. Bioavailability is affected by the route of administration, rate of metabolism, lipid solubility and binding proteins. It is usually < 100% due to degradation or alteration before reaching the target tissue.

bioavailability

Clinical pharmacology The degree to which a drug is available to a target tissue after administration which, for oral drugs, reflects the rate and extent of GI tract absorption; BA is the in vivo presence of a substance in a form that allows it to be metabolized, serve as a substrate, bind a specific molecule, or participate in biochemical reactions. See Oral bioavailability.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
The physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency; proportion of the administered dose that becomes available to exert a pharmacologic effect into the bloodstream.

bioavailability

The amount of a drug that reaches the blood regardless of how it is given. After intravenous injection bioavailability is 100%, but the bioavailability of drugs given by mouth is often much less, because many drugs are broken down by the digestive enzymes and many are poorly absorbed.

Bioavailability

A measure of the amount of drug that is actually absorbed from a given dose.
Mentioned in: Antiretroviral Drugs

bioavailability

physiological availability of a given amount of drug

bioavailability (bīˈ·ō··vālˈ··bilˑ·i·tē),

n the amount of or rate at which a substance or drug is accessible to the body.

bi·o·a·vail·a·bil·i·ty

(bī'ō-ă-vāl'ă-bil'i-tē)
Physiologic availability of a given amount of a drug, as distinct from its chemical potency.

bioavailability

the degree to which a drug or other substance becomes available to the target tissue after administration.
References in periodicals archive ?
KEY WORDS: arsenic, arsenic daily intake values, bioavailability, in vivo, maximum tolerable daily intake, rice, risk assessment, speciation.
Benita added, "This unique system may allow changing the route of administration of highly lipophilic P-glycoprotein substrate drugs from injectable to oral with potentially high bioavailability and lower side effects without affecting the normal physiological activity of the metabolic filters.
At An < 1, the drug would have a permeability-limited low bioavailability because a value less than one would mean that the transit rate is faster than the absorption rate.
From an environmental and consumers perspective, a scalable technology that allows the formulation of supplements with less protein, higher bioavailability, and fewer calories can make protein production more sustainable and help create truly differentiated products for sports nutrition, weight management and clinical nutrition.
Based on the results in Figures 1 to 5, the relative bioavailability of P values for brown- and yellow-seeded peas did not differ regardless of the response criterion used to estimate the bioavailability.
Fully digestible coatings could be utilized in high-performance delivery systems that encapsulate and protect bioactive lipids, including omega-3 fatty acids, carotenoids and phytosterols, during storage, without adversely affecting their bioavailability.
The comparative bioavailability study follows a positivescientific advice meeting with the German Federal Institutefor Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) announced by RedHill in November 2013.
The typically low systemic bioavailability of the lipophilic curcumin is attributed to its poor solubility in the aqueous phase of the digestive tract and its rapid metabolism and excretion from the body.
Compared with four commercial wheat flours of similar flour extraction rate (80%), Zn bioavailability was significantly lower in flour from the control grains, while significantly greater in flour from the biofortified grains.
However, very little information is available about the stability of lycopene and its bioavailability.