bioaccumulation

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bioaccumulation

(bī′ō-ə-kyo͞om′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The accumulation of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in various tissues of a living organism: the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

bi′o·ac·cu′mu·la′tive adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bioaccumulation

The accumulation of chemicals or nutrients in a living organism against an inorganic background (e.g., the external environment), which is due to a high partition coefficient and resistance to degradation by the bioaccumulating organism.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bioaccumulation

the process of concentration of chemical contaminents in animal tissues as they move higher up the food chain e.g. pesticides and heavy metals stored in fatty tissues are passed on from one predator to a higher predator, the resulting concentrations being increasingly harmful and most so to the top predators.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To explore the influence of partitioning properties, we estimated CBATs for four hypothetical partitioning property combinations representing the range of potentially bioaccumulative chemicals in the human food chain (Kelly et al.
Parliament wants imported chemicals to be registered like those produced in the EU, but if they are part of finished articles, they would be exempted, unless they contain persistent bioaccumulative substances or ones with endocrine disrupting properties.
Collins presented information on persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic substances and highlighted the link between sustainability and ethics.
Currently there are no restrictions on any use of cVMS, but regulators in a number of countries are paying more attention to these compounds because of evidence they may be persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic.
The following are concerned: CMRs (substances that are carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic to reproduction); PBT (persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substances); vPvB (very persistent and very bioaccumulative substances); certain substances identified as having serious irreversible effects on humans or the environment, such as endocrine disrupters.
This will particularly apply to biocides, which are categorized as being persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT).
As result, ministers "considered it appropriate to explore a possible extension of priority setting in the registration phase with the inclusion of potential PBTs and vPvBs" (persistent bioaccumulative toxins and very persistent, very bioaccumulative substances).
Section 199 gives similar authority, but is aimed specifically at a smaller list of substances defined as "CEPA-toxic" under Schedule I of CEPA (mainly substances that are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic).
The PBT Profiler will help pigment manufacturers to eliminate persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals before they are fully developed, which will save companies R&D money and regulatory headaches, while lessening the burden on the EPA to test and retest suspect chemicals.