bioaccumulation

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bioaccumulation

(bī′ō-ə-kyo͞om′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The accumulation of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in various tissues of a living organism: the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

bi′o·ac·cu′mu·la′tive adj.

bioaccumulation

The accumulation of chemicals or nutrients in a living organism against an inorganic background (e.g., the external environment), which is due to a high partition coefficient and resistance to degradation by the bioaccumulating organism.

bioaccumulation

the process of concentration of chemical contaminents in animal tissues as they move higher up the food chain e.g. pesticides and heavy metals stored in fatty tissues are passed on from one predator to a higher predator, the resulting concentrations being increasingly harmful and most so to the top predators.

bioaccumulation

process producing an increase in the concentration of chemicals (usually toxins) in the tissues of organisms with each increase in the trophic level in the food chain. Examples include chlorinated hydrocarbons which reach their greatest concentrations in predatory birds and pelicans, and ciguatera in which the toxins are concentrated in large predatory fish such as gropers, barracudas and mackerel.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Committee endorsed for publication a reflection paper on the authorisation of veterinary medicinal products containing (potential) persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) or very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) substances (EMA/CVMP/448211/2015) after adoption in April 2017 following the close of the public consultation and subsequent adoption by the Heads of Medicines Agencies (HMA).
Abelkop, Graham, and Royer report the results of a multi-year international project examining the science, policies, and practices involved in identifying and governing persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic chemicals.
The Agency chose the chemicals based on whether they are persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic, used in children's or consumers products, and detected in humans.
Lead is a persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substance that can cause developmental harm, especially in children.
Polybrominated Bipenyl Ethers (PBDEs) is a new-style persistent organic pollutants, mainly originated from brominated Flame Retard in electric products, which is found to be toxic and bioaccumulative.
Under the REACH regulation, authorization is required to use substances of very high concern including: those that are carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic to reproduction (CMR); persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) or very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) substances; and those causing probable serious effects to humans or the environment identified on a case-by-case basis, such as endocrine disrupters.
But added to these were the oft forgotten and dangerously immeasurable bioaccumulative toxics, which may prove to be major threats to our species and of which, by accident or design, we know little about the long-term effects.
The agency will also be able to take action against toxic, bioaccumulative chemicals more quickly.
nik announced criteria for the identification of persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic substances, (or very persistent and very bioaccumulative) under REACH.
Many of these chemicals of concern are environmentally persistent as well as bioaccumulative -- meaning that they can build up in human fat tissue.
The regulation entered into force in 2007, but Swedish MEP Carl Schlyter (Greens-EFA) called into question the the mooted list of potentially harmful substances (Annex XIV) and the regulation's definition of so-called persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTs).