bioaccumulation


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Related to bioaccumulation: Bioaccumulation Factor

bioaccumulation

(bī′ō-ə-kyo͞om′yə-lā′shən)
n.
The accumulation of a substance, such as a toxic chemical, in various tissues of a living organism: the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish.

bi′o·ac·cu′mu·la′tive adj.

bioaccumulation

The accumulation of chemicals or nutrients in a living organism against an inorganic background (e.g., the external environment), which is due to a high partition coefficient and resistance to degradation by the bioaccumulating organism.

bioaccumulation

the process of concentration of chemical contaminents in animal tissues as they move higher up the food chain e.g. pesticides and heavy metals stored in fatty tissues are passed on from one predator to a higher predator, the resulting concentrations being increasingly harmful and most so to the top predators.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oysters (uncontaminated or after bioaccumulation) were shucked, and the flesh was fixed in 10% formaldehyde for 48 hours.
In the past, bioaccumulation has been an issue with pesticides such as DDT and hazardous industrial by-products such as dioxins and PCBs.
The data also clearly illustrate the ability of some willows to take up significant amounts of Cd from soil, with a mean bioaccumulation coefficient of 13 (Table 2).
Bioaccumulation of Toxins in Rodents Residing on "Highway Islands" in Michigan's Saginaw and Bay Counties.
The ED calculation inputs include daily food, water and soil intake, bioaccumulation or bioconcentration, and body weight.
Bioaccumulation and "ecological deterioration" are two of the most worrying effects of the poisoning of trophic networks and of ecological cycles.
Indeed, there was not even a theory of bioaccumulation. Only by gaining experience with these substances were we able to learn about their downside and eventually decide that other, less persistent pesticides achieved a better tradeoff between human benefits and harm to the natural environment.
Bioaccumulation factors measure a chemical's potential to accumulate in fish tissue through exposure to both water and food.
But the effects of contaminants on the region's wildlife imply 'a special need to investigate the extent to which bioaccumulation and biomagnification of toxic contaminants in the food web may lead to developmental effects in children," Liroff says.
As for humans, plastics pose a threat to our health due to the bioaccumulation of toxins that seep from the pollution.
Phytoplankton counts the most photosynthesizing organisms and, therefore, it is important for producing biomass, oxygen, and the initial bioaccumulation of several compounds, including pollutants.
The aim of the present study was to determine the level of selected toxicants in water, their bioaccumulation and effects on antioxidant enzymes i.e.