binomial


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binomial

 [bi-no´me-al]
composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl),
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
See also: binary combination.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial

/bi·no·mi·al/ (bi-no´me-al) composed of two terms, e.g., names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial

(bī-nō′mē-əl)
adj.
Consisting of or relating to two names or terms.
n.
Biology A taxonomic name in binomial nomenclature.

bi·no′mi·al·ly adv.

binomial

[bīnō′mē·əl]
1 containing two names or terms.
2 the unique, two-part scientific name used to identify a plant. The first name is the genus; the second, the species. A designation of the variety may also follow to further differentiate the plant. Use of the binomial is the only reliable way to accurately specify a particular herb, since common names differ from region to region and a single common name may often denote several herbs that differ widely from one another.

binomial

adjective Referring to an organism’s binomen—i.e., its genus and species names.

bi·no·mi·al

(bī-nō'mē-ăl)
A set of two terms or names; in the probabilistic or statistical sense it corresponds to a Bernoulli trial.
[bi- + G. nomos, name]

binomial (bī·nōˑ·mē·l),

n the taxonomic name for plants that always consists of two parts: the genus, which is the first name and is always capitalized, and the species, which is the second name and is always lower-case. These names should be used instead of common names to avoid confusion in the identification of herbs. Also called
botanical name, Latin name, or
scientific name.

binomial

composed of two terms, e.g. names of organisms formed by combination of genus and species names.

binomial distribution
categorization of a group into two mutually exclusive subgroups, e.g. sick and not sick.
binomial population
a population which can be divided into a binomial distribution.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixth, one data set (Mixon) was satisfactorily fit by two distributions: the negative binomial distribution and the inflated geometric distribution.
We investigated the logarithmic-link function (log-link) of the parameter [lambda], which was used to linearize the mean from the negative binomial.
With respect to the Poisson distribution fit, chi-square results greater than those of the negative binomial fit were obtained (Table 2), indicating the best fit of the negative binomial, confirmed by the aggregation indices.
Neutrosophic Binomial Random Variable: It is defined as the number of success when we perform the experiment n [greater than or equal to] 1 times, and is denoted as 'x'.
Conversely, a negative binomial distribution (based on a Gamma-distributed error term) is commonly used when the data are overdispersed by assuming
Poisson and negative binomial regression models are different in regards to their assumptions of the mean and variance of the dependents variables, in the case of Poison model the assumption is the mean and variance of the distributions are equal i.
We generate n independent Bern(p) and add them to obtain a Binomial B(n, p) distribution.
The results provide an estimate of the number of funds expected to win as a result of skill using the standard binomial distribution.
It is worth mentioning that the Wald method applied to the comparison of two binomial proportions or generalized for binomial linear functions put forth in the literature does not consider zero-inflated binomial (ZIB) samples.
Estos son utilizados preferentemente en el planteamiento de modelos de decision y en la mayoria de las aplicaciones de opciones reales (Trigeorgis, 1995, 1997; Luherman, 1998; Amram y Kulatilaka, 1998, Mun, 2004), reconociendo sus raices en el clasico modelo binomial (Cox, Ross y Rubinstein, 1979).