binocular


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binocular

 [bin-ok´u-ler]
1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

bin·oc·u·lar

(bin-ok'yū-lăr),
Adapted to the use of both eyes; said of an optic instrument.
[L. bini, paired, + oculus, eye]

binocular

/bin·oc·u·lar/ (bĭ-nok´u-ler)
1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

binocular

(bə-nŏk′yə-lər, bī-)
adj.
1. Relating to, used by, or involving both eyes at the same time: binocular vision.
2. Having two eyes arranged to produce stereoscopic vision.

bin·oc′u·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
bin·oc′u·lar·ly adv.

binocular

[bīnok′yələr, bin-]
Etymology: L, bini + oculus, eye
1 pertaining to both eyes, especially regarding vision.
2 a microscope, telescope, or field glass that can accommodate viewing by both eyes.

binocular

adjective Referring to 2 eyes; using 2 eyes at once—e.g., binocular vision; adapted for 2 eyes, as in a binocular microscope.

noun A binocular glass—e.g., opera glass, microscope, binoculars.

bin·oc·u·lar

(bin-ok'yū-lăr)
Adapted to the use of both eyes; said of an optic instrument.
[L. bini, paired, + oculus, eye]

binocular

Pertaining to both eyes or to the simultaneous use of both eyes.

binocular

pertaining to the use of both eyes as in stereoscopic vision.

Binocular

Both eyes accurately pointing to the same object.
Mentioned in: Vision Training

binocular 

Pertaining to both eyes.

binocular 

Pertaining to the use of the two eyes but without fusion or stereopsis. The term is primarily used in clinical testing and vision therapy in which different prisms are placed in front of each eye.

binocular

1. pertaining to both eyes.
2. having two eyepieces, as in a microscope.

binocular field
the field of vision, simultaneously received by both eyes. Varies between animal species, depending on the placement of the eyes in the skull. Widest in the cat (90°), 60-70° in the horse and 15° in poultry.
Enlarge picture
Field of vision of predatory animals. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004
References in periodicals archive ?
Randy placed the binoculars so the eyepieces would perfectly reach his eyes when the crutch pads were firm against his shoulders.
Since then, whenever possible I've always used my binoculars on a tripod, and I've learned one thing conclusively --you will spot far more effectively with a 7X binocular on a tripod than you will with a 10X handheld.
Most binoculars will provide you with a field of view of about three to five degrees.
You can even build a shoulder binocular stabilizer from scrap wood; see SkyandTelescope.
The larger the twilight factor, the better a binocular is for low-light observing.
Regardless of your Northern or Southern heritage, you just might let out a rebel yell when the cashier tells you the 10x42 Rebel binoculars you are buying from Redfield will cost less than $200.
Johnson-Stewart contracted product management services leader Innovation Direct[TM] to represent the Binocular Wear to potential licensees for a 2 year period.
The effects of errors in binocular motor control and in sensory fusion of the two images
Of course it is necessary to realise the limitations of binoculars.
The bridge binocular keys were bought from the family by British Titanic historian Peter Boyd-Smith in 1977.
However, trainer Nicky Henderson feels Binocular is further forward at this stage of the season.
Because you must see game before your rifle becomes useful, the binocular is at least as important.