binding

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Related to bindingness: conferred, reconfirm, pay heed, vitiation

binding

(bīnd'ing),
The perceptual connection between aspects of a visual experience, such that the color of a moving object appears to be unified with the object (for example, whereas movement and color are processed in different brain regions).

binding

The specific adherence of a molecule to one or more others, which reflects complementarity between between them—e.g., enzymes binding to substrates; antibodies to antigens; DNA to complementary strands of nucleic acids.

bind·ing

(bīnd'ing)
The perceptual connection between aspects of a visual experience, such that the color of a moving object appears to be unified with the object (e.g., whereas movement and color are processed in different brain regions).

binding,

n a reversible combination of various drugs with body constituents such as plasma proteins.

binding

1. holding separate units together.
2. in meat hygiene terms, the capacity to absorb and retain water.

binding element
a specific sequence in DNA, usually less than 10 nucleotides, to which a particular protein binds; the tertiary structure of the sequence also influences the binding.
binding quality
a measurement of the binding capacity of a sample, e.g. of meat.
binding test
is used to measure amounts of antigen or antibody by measuring the amount to which it is bound in an immune complex either directly (primary), after separation by precipitation, agglutination or complement fixation (secondary) or the in vivo effects (tertiary).

Patient discussion about binding

Q. My friend has Progressive MS, he is bound to a wheelchair, Prognosis? How can I help? He must be moved by a Hoyer Lift, he has caregivers. He has a beautiful voice and does have enough ability to move in his chair around local community. He has some bad days with spacicity, I want to help but am unsure as to how? He is 60? or so and lives on his own, he has had MS for many years and a number of complications, such as pneumonia and decubitus. Please help me to help him!

A. There are a number of ideas and resources for social and recreational activities (i.e. wheelchair sports, dancing, travel, aviation, etc.) that may be helpful, which can be found at www.mobility-advisor.com.

More discussions about binding
References in periodicals archive ?
C (demonstrating that the impact of a tribunal's decision on the legality of an action is unrelated to the bindingness of its ruling).
It is also likely that more bindingness has led to increases in the side payments governments are forced to make to groups in order to buy their support for trade agreements.
It might be that bindingness is built into the semantics of the judgment that something is morally good or morally right or morally ought to be done.
Speech Matters is self-consciously a work of nonideal theory, that is, a discussion of the bindingness of normative requirements in the context of actual or "real-world," as opposed to idealized constructed or theoretical conditions (p.
courts or the bindingness of precedent perceive the value of a tribunal
Engaging a normative approach to determine the scope of rights is useful because it places less focus on the bindingness of any particular instrument and instead focuses on the totality of international law's protections to identify emerging international norms.
the bindingness of promises in effect harnesses moral reasons in service
A norm rooted in conduct is a norm of customary international law in virtue of its integration into the system of norms (the corpus juris) of international law, not in virtue of beliefs of actors or judges about the legal status or bindingness of the norm.
The massive literature on the moral bindingness of promises establishes only that if you promised to do X or led others reasonably to believe you promised to do X, you should do it if it is reasonably within your power to do it.
An analysis of the latter scenario unveils the source of the bindingness of our epistemic duty: in assenting to a clear and distinct idea we experience our will as fully unified with our intellect and as the only source of our inclination to assent; intellectual necessity and intellectual freedom are now one and the same.
Res judicata loses its bindingness when it does not emanate from a fair contest: fraus omnia corrumpit (fraud spoils everything).
Neither of these opposing sources of the bindingness of the constitution were centered on factual or other circumstances that might have contributed to the actual efficacy or effectiveness of any resulting constitution.