bimodal

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bi·mod·al

(bī-mō'dăl),
Denoting a frequency curve characterized by two peaks.

bimodal

(bī″mō′dăl) [ bi- + modal]
1. Pert. to a graphic presentation that contains two peaks.
2. Pert. to a set of data that has two distinct maximum values.
References in periodicals archive ?
ELij - effect of ELHMF and lactation interaction, EBik-effect of ELHMF and bimodality of milk flow curves interaction,
In table 2, we list the results for the difference in OUP and safety stock between the estimated and actual distributions for selected levels of the high bimodality and gamma lead time distributions for all experimental levels of PNS and review period (R).
Cannibals and parasites: Conflicting regulators of bimodality in high latitude Arctic char, Salvelinus alpinus.
Mixture of Normals has a special feature that is to naturally represent bimodality.
Number 41 Lorito-Lorito (Peru) explores bimodality.
The present study indicated that various parameters of the score distributions, including differences in variance, skewness, kurtosis, bimodality, and outlier-proneness, are inherited by ranks.
The event that was responsible for the loss of a chromosome pair as an independent unit has created a karyotype with a bimodality chromosome size that is uncommon in tettigoniids, since generally they can be ordered in a decreasing order of size, with the X being always the largest chromosome of complement, even when the species has a XO sex mechanism.
This paper has argued that one cannot really understand shifts in communion frequency in the pre-Vatican II Australian Church without appreciating a critical bimodality at the very heart of ecclesiastical discourse.
The bimodality combines good processability with good mechanical properties.
The bimodality is not apparent in Figure 1 or in Bergstrom's (1962) sketch, but it becomes apparent over a wider domain, particularly when the equation is weakly identified (i.
By bimodality he meant that concentrated large firms account for approximately half of the market activity, while the dispersed sector accounts for the other half.