gold standard

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gold stan·dard

the term criterion standard is preferred in medical writing.
Term used to describe a method or procedure that is widely recognized as the best available.
[jargon]

gold standard

1 an accepted test that is assumed to be able to determine the true disease state of a patient regardless of positive or negative test findings or sensitivities or specificities of other diagnostic tests used.
2 an acknowledged measure of comparison of the superior effectiveness or value of a particular medication or other therapy as compared with that of other drugs or treatments.
Any standardised clinical assessment, method, procedure, intervention or measurement of known validity and reliability which is generally taken to be the best available, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared

gold standard

Criterion standard The best or most successful diagnostic or therapeutic modality for a condition, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared. See Standard of practice, Practice guidelines.

gold stan·dard

(gōld stan'dărd)
Jargonistic term meaning ideal or basic measurement; usage best avoided.
[jargon]

gold

a chemical element, atomic number 79, atomic weight 196.967, symbol Au. See Table 6. Gold and many of its compounds are used in human medicine and occasionally in veterinary medicine. See also chrysotherapy.

gold-198
a radioisotope of gold having a half-life of 2.7 days and emitting gamma and beta radiation. Symbol 198Au.
gold colloid scintiscan
gold dust
a disease of aquarium fish caused by the flagellate protozoon Oodinium limnecicum. Affected fish develop a varnished look caused by a very heavy infestation of the protozoa on the skin and die within a few days.
gold standard
the ultimate standard to which all endeavors aspire.
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking in Iowa, the ubiquitous Sickles, useful to McKinley because he was a conservative Democrat deeply opposed to bimetallism, noted: "I could not permit Jeff Davis to make a platform for me in 1861.
Bimetallism used coins of silver and coins of gold with a fixed exchange rate between the two.
The French government, however, never ratified the provisional Franco-Austrian monetary convention of 1867, worried by the consequences of Austrian inconvertibility and by the request to abandon bimetallism for the gold standard.
A member of the Darwin family, he served as an officer in the Royal Engineers for 29 years (during which he participated in a number of astronomical expeditions), had three years as an MP and three as President of the Royal Geographical Society, and ten years as the Chairman of Bedford College; his substantial publications include works on bimetallism and eugenics.
Productive interests, so it is argued, wanted a strategy of industrial regeneration, and favoured protection to secure empire markets, and bimetallism which would increase the amount of currency, raise price levels and so reduce the burden of their debts.
Here events and ideas are seen in juxtaposition, gold monometallism, bimetallism, indexation, managed money, and central banking making an appearance, along with some additional writers, most notably Leon Walras and Francis Ysidro Edgeworth; Edgeworth and his 1888 article "The Mathematical Theory of Banking" are singled out for special attention.
513)(1) This last remark is of course slightly exaggerated: as OED tells us, bimetallism is |the system of allowing the unrestricted currency of two metals (e.
The act provided for a decimal system of coinage and a standard of bimetallism, with silver and gold as legal tender at a ratio of 15 to 1 by weight.
In 1816, England officially abandoned bimetallism and made silver coins into tokens that were only limited legal tender.
James Matthew Wilson wonders whether the narcissistic posturing of many contemporary poets--especially of the academic species--has not reduced poetry from an object of dislike to a state of utter insignificance, like debates over bimetallism.
The United States formally adopted the gold standard only in 1879--a move intended essentially to revert to the status quo ante bellum, but with the importance difference that the new system was a de jure gold standard and not a bimetallism that functioned de facto as a gold standard.
Although not immediately noticed, the list omitted the silver dollar, effectively ending the period of de jure bimetallism that had been initiated by Alexander Hamilton three-quarters of a century earlier; full resumption of the gold standard happened by January 1, 1879.