gold standard

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gold stan·dard

the term criterion standard is preferred in medical writing.
Term used to describe a method or procedure that is widely recognized as the best available.
[jargon]
Any standardised clinical assessment, method, procedure, intervention or measurement of known validity and reliability which is generally taken to be the best available, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared

gold standard

Criterion standard The best or most successful diagnostic or therapeutic modality for a condition, against which new tests or results and protocols are compared. See Standard of practice, Practice guidelines.

gold stan·dard

(gōld stan'dărd)
Jargonistic term meaning ideal or basic measurement; usage best avoided.
[jargon]
References in periodicals archive ?
In those years, many attempts to institutionalize bimetallism happened, shaking the confidence in the U.S.
Bimetallism faded with the vast expansion of gold supplies and the agricultural boom just after the turn of the century.
Martin, 1973, "1853: The End of Bimetallism in the United States," Journal of Economic History 33.
Coming from a senator representing South Carolina, Tillman's intemperate remarks on secession and section offered opponents of bimetallism an opportunity to attack free silver as both financially unsound and as a new threat to national unity.
Bimetallism, which until 1873 had been the system in a number of other countries, disappeared abruptly.
Like many others, they have accepted uncritically the old story about the author of The Wizard of Oz being a supporter of William Jennings Bryan and bimetallism during the 1896 campaign.
With the growing size of participating states and the transformation of money, thanks to the end of bimetallism and the wider use of bank notes and deposits, the objectives and the practical management of monetary unions became more complex and more political.
While Bitter is right in stressing that few things are inevitable, it does not follow that greenbackism, bimetallism, corn banking would have limited big business and favored a balanced agrarian-artisan republican economy.
Hence the drive to restore the dollar to its pre-war parity with gold may have entailed more deflation than would have been expected from o resumption of bimetallism which, presumably, would have meant more rapid money supply growth (see Friedman, 1990).
The best-known rule was the gold standard, but other proposed rules included bimetallism, commodity standards, and Irving Fisher's compensated dollar.
Surely, the currency risk was already low under preceding bimetallism. Moreover, the market for international acceptances was, from 1870 on, monopolized by London; international acceptances did play substitute for vanishing bills of exchange in Britain, but not elsewhere.
18 Gould, 241, describes how bimetallism produced a situation in which "given monetary authority got out of step" with the market.