bilobed flap

bilobed flap

flap designed with segments, A and B, so that flap A rotates into the recipient defect, flap B closes the defect left by flap A, and the flap B donor site is closed primarily. Usually designed as a rotation flap and employed where donor tissue is scarce. Because flap B closes flap A's donor site, the true donor defect is moved farther from the original recipient site into a region that will permit primary soft tissue closure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reconstruction methods according to nasal subunits DORSUM Primary Closure 12 Glabellar Advancement 12 Skin Craft 7 Bilobed Flap 5 Paramedian Forejead Flap 5 Cryotherapy 2 Prosthesis 1 ALAR REGION Nasolabial 34 Bilobed Flap 7 Paramedian Forejead Flap 5 Malar Advancement 3 Skin Graft 3 Composite Graft 1 Secondary Healing 4 Glabellar Advancement 1 Cryotherapy 1 Radiotherapy 1 SIDEWALL Primary Closure 4 Malar Advancement 9 Skin Graft 9 V-Y Advancement 8 Island Flap 8 Bilobed Flap 6 Paramedian Forejead Flap 4 Glabellar Advancement 1 Nasolabial 1 NASAL TIP Skin Graft 16 Bilobed Flap 13 Paramedian Forehead Flap 5 Anchor Flap 1 Glabellar Advancement 2 Cryotherapy 4 Note: Table made from bar graph.
Objective: To establish that the bilobed flap as soft tissue release component for the radial club hand is superior to the z-plasty technique in type III and IV radial club hands.
Modified bilobed flap for one-stage earlobe reconstruction: A case report.
We used the bilobed flap advocated by Zettili as the repair of choice for defects located between 0.5 and 1.5 cm of the distal and lateral aspect of the nose particularly defects involving the lateral tip supratip or defects near the tip 17-19.
For the upper area, the bilobed flap was designed at the left buttock and positioned over the area of the defect.
(3) The bilobed radial forearm flap is widely accepted and used for tongue reconstruction but, to the best of our knowledge, ours is the first report in the English literature of the use of a double bilobed flap design for this purpose.
The microscalpel is also useful for creating small cutaneous flaps, such as a nasal bilobed flap, and for cutting the outline for geometric broken-line closure in scar revision (figure 2).
The reconstructive options that were considered at the time included placing a bilobed flap, a radial forearm fasciocutaneous free flap, a pectoralis myocutaneous flap, and a local advancement/rotation flap.
(1) Local transposition flaps such as the bilobed flap are often used to close small (<1.5 cm) defects, but for larger defects and for those that involve vestibular lining, the melolabial or nasolabial flap is more appropriate.
The use of a bilobed flap is a practical means of repairing surface defects of the nose that are smaller than 1.5 cm in diameter.
The use of a bilobed flap in repairing surface defects of the nose was first described by Zitelli in 1918, according to Mobley in this month's Facial Plastic Surgery Clinic.