bill

(redirected from bills)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

BILL

Abbreviation for bass increase at low levels , under level.

Bill

(bil),
Arthur H., U.S. obstetrician, 1877-1961. See: Bill maneuver.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bill

(bĭl)
n.
1. A structure projecting from the head of a bird, consisting of the jaws and their horny covering and including the upper and lower mandibles; a beak.
2. A similar horny mouth part, such as that of a turtle.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bill

A proposal for new legislation in Parliament. Most important bills are introduced to Parliament by a government minister and relate to public policy. If the bill is approved by a majority of members of both the House of Commons and House of Lords, it will become an Act of Parliament and the law of the land.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bill

see BEAK.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in classic literature ?
Freddie Drummond was entirely safe, but Bill had fallen in love.
It was time that he was married, anyway, and he was fully aware that if Freddie Drummond didn't get married, Bill Totts assuredly would, and the complications were too awful to contemplate.
Ah, Bill, Bill, we have seen a sight of times, us two, since I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.
"That's you, Bill," returned Black Dog, "you're in the right of it, Billy.
Bill was that rare kind of boy who could pull away from the traces just when he seemed most thoroughly broken to the harness.
"You had better go to bed, Bill; at once, without arguing."
"I guess you'd better get out of Marseilles before Tough Bill comes out of hospital," he said to Strickland, when they had got back to the Chink's Head and were cleaning themselves.
Turning now to the Workmen he asserted that their interests must not be neglected, and that, if they intended to accept the Colour Bill, they ought at least to do so with full view of the consequences.
But he found himself encompassed with guards and forced to remain silent while the Chief Circle in a few impassioned words made a final appeal to the Women, exclaiming that, if the Colour Bill passed, no marriage would henceforth be safe, no woman's honour secure; fraud, deception, hypocrisy would pervade every household; domestic bliss would share the fate of the Constitution and pass to speedy perdition.
Bill had finished his pipe and was helping his companion to spread the bed of fur and blanket upon the spruce boughs which he had laid over the snow before supper.
"You're botherin' too much, Bill," came the sleepy response.
'Do you mean to tell me, Bill,' said the Jew: softening as the other grew heated: 'that neither of the two men in the house can be got over?'