billion


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billion

[Fr. bi, two, + million, million]
1. In the U.S., billion is a number equal to 1 followed by 9 zeros (1,000,000,000) or (109).
2. In Europe, billion is a number equal to 1 followed by 12 zeros (1012), that is, bi-million, or twice the number of zeros in a million (106).
References in periodicals archive ?
628 billion for various development projects of Higher Education Commission out of total allocation of Rs35.
961 billion allocated for Federal Education and Professional Training Division.
119 billion and its total expenditures stood at Rs 277.
5 billion bid during a conference call, according to media reports.
2 billion in insured losses during the third quarter of 2005.
Cruz Bustamante blasted the Republican governor for a budget that may close this year's projected $15 billion shortfall, but relies on significant borrowing and one-time accounting gimmicks while sparing the state's affluent residents from tax increases in favor of raising tuition on college students.
Based on the officially reported "surpluses"/deficits, the huge deficits during first Bush presidency peaked at $290 billion in 1992, ebbed during the Clinton administration, and then returned with a vengeance during the second Bush presidency.
North America IT services revenue in 2001 is projected to reach $271 billion, and the region will continue to drive worldwide sales through 2005, as North America revenue totals $423 billion.
That package of $433 billion in deficit reduction over a five-year period wasn't even passed until August 1993, less than two months before the end of fiscal 1993.
As recently as five years ago, the United States posted a trade deficit of $28 billion with Western Europe.
Merrill Lynch says that the tax's side effects would include "a $25 billion reduction in the Gross National Product" and "a 250,000 person increase in unemployment.