bill

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BILL

Abbreviation for bass increase at low levels , under level.

Bill

(bil),
Arthur H., U.S. obstetrician, 1877-1961. See: Bill maneuver.

bill

(bĭl)
n.
1. A structure projecting from the head of a bird, consisting of the jaws and their horny covering and including the upper and lower mandibles; a beak.
2. A similar horny mouth part, such as that of a turtle.

bill

A proposal for new legislation in Parliament. Most important bills are introduced to Parliament by a government minister and relate to public policy. If the bill is approved by a majority of members of both the House of Commons and House of Lords, it will become an Act of Parliament and the law of the land.

bill

see BEAK.

bill

see beak.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geoffrey Adams, who was described as suffering from a depressive illness, killed his 52-year-old wife Glenys with a billhook used for trimming hedges in a "gruesome and bizarre" attack, Stafford Crown Court heard.
And she shows pupils how to build fires, use saws and billhooks, and compose rap songs, giving them a lifelong love of the outdoors and providing skills for life.
The battle turned into a rout as the French knights in heavy armour were cut down by the English using billhooks and hatchets.
After two days of using bow saws, billhooks, loppers and square lashings our structure was finished.
RANGER CAMP A PRACTICAL conservation encampment will be held at Yorkswood, Kendrick Avenue B34 from 1pm-3pm tomorrow, featuring pole, lathe and billhooks.
Blacksmith Stephen Mather, 40, of nearby Holbourn Smithy, used more than two tonnes of metal to handcraft longbows, billhooks, arrows, the Flodden Cross, an English rose crest, flag, Lamb of God emblems, the contours of the hills where the battle took place and the crenellations of Barmoor Castle.
As a lightly armored, mobile force, they used swords, hatchets, mallets, and billhooks to stab and beat heavily armored French combatants who were mired in the mud (see Keegan, 2004, for a graphic and earthy account).