biliverdin


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Related to biliverdin: bilirubin, urobilinogen, Bivalirudin

biliverdin

 [bil″ĭ-ver´din]
a green bile pigment that is formed by catabolism of hemoglobin and converted to bilirubin in the liver.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bil·i·ver·din

, biliverdine (bil'i-ver'din),
A green bile pigment formed from the oxidation of heme; a bilin with a structure almost identical to that of bilirubin.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

biliverdin

(bĭl′ĭ-vûr′dĭn, bĭl′ĭ-vûr′dĭn)
n.
A green pigment, C33H34N4O6, occurring in bile and sometimes formed by oxidation of bilirubin.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bil·i·ver·din

(bil'i-vĕr-din)
Green pigments that occur in bile.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

biliverdin

a greenish BILE pigment.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Maines, "Purification and characterization of biliverdin reductase from rat liver," Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
While it has been suggested that the blue skeleton of Heliopora originated from biliverdin IX[alpha] (Rudiger et al., 1968), which occurs as a result of heme degradation, to our knowledge there is no evidence that biliverdin IX[alpha] is synthesized in Heliopora.
Ndisang, "A critical and comprehensive insight on heme oxygenase and related products including carbon monoxide, bilirubin, biliverdin and ferritin in type-1 and type-2 diabetes," Current Pharmaceutical Design, vol.
Hosicket al., "Biliverdin reductase A attenuates hepatic steatosis by inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK) 3[beta] phosphorylation of serine 73 of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) [alpha]", The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol.
Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is the enzyme that degrades heme into biliverdin, carbon monoxide (CO), and free iron.
They indicate that these lizard species build up a toxic substance called biliverdin. The lizards' red blood cells still depend on hemoglobin, the stuff that ferries oxygen and makes most animal blood red, but any lizard-blood redness is overwhelmed by massive concentrations of the green biliverdin.
This enzyme, apart from playing a major role in the degradation of heme to carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin, has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties, and provides antioxidative protection to endothelial progenitor cells, by being a key enzyme in their biology (Dulak et al.
Among the antioxidant genes activated by Nrf2, one of the most commonly studied is the heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) gene which converts free heme, which has prooxidant effects, into iron, carbon monoxide (CO), and biliverdin, with the last being converted into the antioxidant bilirubin via an activity also raised by Nrf2, the two biliverdin reductase genes.
This difference in color was due to variation in natural pigments such as biliverdin or carotenoids present in buffalo or cow milk.
Hemeoxygenase-I is an enzyme that plays a role in the reduction of heme to biliverdin, carbon monoxide, and free divalent iron.
They involve converting conjugated bilirubin forms into biliverdin and, unlike the diazo method, are unaffected by coexisting substances such as hemoglobin or vitamin C (6).