bilirubinemia


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Related to bilirubinemia: bilirubinuria

bilirubinemia

 [bil″ĭ-roo″bĭ-ne´me-ah]
the presence of bilirubin in the blood.

bil·i·ru·bi·ne·mi·a

(bil'i-rū-bin-ē'mē-ă),
The presence of bilirubin in the blood, where it is normally present in relatively small amounts; the term is usually used in relation to increased concentrations observed in various pathologic conditions with excessive destruction of erythrocytes or interference with the mechanism of excretion in the bile. Determination of the quantity of bilirubin in the blood serum reveals two fractions, namely direct reacting (conjugated) and indirect reacting (nonconjugated) bilirubin; determination of conjugated and total bilirubin in serum is an important and frequently used clinical laboratory test.
[bilirubin + G. haima, blood]

bilirubinemia

[-ē′mē·ə]
Etymology: L, bilis, bile, ruber, red; Gk, haima, blood
the presence of bilirubin in the blood.

bilirubinaemia

A term which, when used with a qualifier (e.g., hyper-), dignifies the presence, overabundance or absence of bilirubin in the blood.

bil·i·ru·bi·ne·mi·a

(bil'i-rū-bin-ē'mē-ă)
The presence of increased amounts of bilirubin in the blood, where it is normally present in only relatively small amounts; usually used to describe various pathologic conditions in which there is excessive destruction of erythrocytes or interference with the mechanism of excretion in the bile. Determination of the quantity of bilirubin in the blood serum reveals two fractions, namely direct reacting (conjugated) and indirect reacting (nonconjugated) bilirubin; determination of direct bilirubin and total bilirubin in serum is an important and frequently used clinical laboratory test.
Synonym(s): bilirubinaemia.
[bilirubin + G. haima, blood]

bilirubinemia (bi·lē·rōōˈ·bi·nēˑ·mē·),

n the presence of elevated bilirubin in the bloodstream.

bil·i·ru·bi·ne·mi·a

(bil'i-rū-bin-ē'mē-ă)
The presence of increased amounts of bilirubin in the blood, where it is normally present in only relatively small amounts; usually used to describe various pathologic conditions in which there is excessive destruction of erythrocytes or interference with the mechanism of excretion in the bile.
Synonym(s): bilirubinaemia.
[bilirubin + G. haima, blood]

bilirubinemia (bil´irōōbinē´mēə),

n the presence of bilirubin in the blood. It may result from obstruction inside or outside the liver or from increased hemolysis. The total serum bilirubin in an adult is 0.2 to 0.7 mg/100 ml.

bilirubinemia

the presence of bilirubin in the blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common treatment-related serious adverse events (1% each) in the combined prophylaxis studies were bilirubinemia, increased hepatic enzymes, hepatocellular damage, nausea, and vomiting.
Transcutaneous bilirubinometry in the management of bilirubinemia in term neonates.
Serious AEs at least possibly related occurred in 3 of 84 patients (4 percent) at 300 mg/m2/day (pancreatitis, hemorrhage, liver failure, bilirubinemia, coagulation disorder, neuropathy, pruritus).
The method compares well with the existing alumina column and magnetic alumina particle TIBC methods, is specific for TIBC, and is unaffected by lipemia, bilirubinemia, hemolysis, and other potentially interfering compounds.
The company is seeking FDA marketing clearance for use of the Colormate III(TM) in the noninvasive monitoring of bilirubinemia in newborn babies.
the neonatal outcomes studied included adverse respiratory outcomes(respiratory distress syndrome, transient tachypnoea of the newborn) hypoglycemia, hyper bilirubinemia, neonatal sepsis, neonatal seizures, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, necrotizing entericolitis, cardiopulmonary resuscitation or ventilator support within 24 hours of birth, prolonged hospitalization (5 days or longer).
While in those delivered at or after 39 weeks none of the babies had respiratory distress, one had hyper bilirubinemia and two had neonatal sepsis.
But as bedside calculation of MELD score is difficult and creatinine values are underestimated in the context of hyper bilirubinemia the Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score (GAHS) was proposed.
Hyper bilirubinemia has been linked with increased malaria related mortality.
Several risk factors associated with hearing loss during early infancy have been described by Joint Committee on Infant Hearing which includes hereditary cause, in utero infection, prematurity, asphyxia, hyper bilirubinemia and ototoxic medications.
Neonatal Hyper bilirubinemia is an adverse perinatal clinical event that places the affected neonate at an increased risk of hearing impairment (1) After delivery of the fetus and entrance to a new environment; neonate encounters a critical situation with increased oxygen concentration and increased production of bilirubin.