biliary colic


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Related to biliary colic: choledocholithiasis, cholangitis, renal colic

colic

 [kol´ik]
acute paroxysmal abdominal pain. It is particularly common during the first three months of life; the infant has paroxysmal, unexplained crying and may pull up arms and legs, turn red-faced, and expel gas from the anus or belch it up from the stomach. The exact cause of infantile colic is not known but several factors may contribute to it, including excessive swallowing of air, too rapid feeding or overfeeding, parental anxiety, allergy to milk, or other feeding problems. It generally occurs at the same time of day, usually at the busiest period. The parents need sympathetic support and assurance that the condition is not serious and most infants gain weight and are healthy in spite of the colic.
biliary colic colic due to passage of gallstones along the bile duct.
gastric colic gastrodynia.
lead colic colic due to lead poisoning.
menstrual colic dysmenorrhea.
renal colic intermittent, acute pain beginning in the kidney region and radiating forward and down to the abdomen, genitalia, and legs; the usual cause is calculi in a kidney or ureter. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, and a desire to urinate frequently.

bil·i·ar·y col·ic

intense spasmodic pain felt in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen from impaction of a gallstone in the cystic duct.

biliary colic

Etymology: L, bilis + kolikos, colon pain
a type of smooth muscle or visceral pain specifically associated with the passing of stones through the bile ducts. Also called cholecystalgia. See also biliary calculus.

bil·i·ar·y col·ic

(bil'ē-ār-ē kol'ik)
Steady, ill-defined epigastric or right upper quadrant pain generally resulting from impaction of a gallstone in the cystic duct or ampulla of Vater with resulting distention of the gallbladder or biliary tract.

biliary colic

Severe pain caused by the attempts of the gall bladder or bile duct to overcome the obstruction of a gallstone by contraction of the muscle fibres in the wall.

Patient discussion about biliary colic

Q. what do i do with my gallbladder i'm not living a norimal life. i'm in pain every day. i cant eat the foods that i like because they make me hurt to bad. who says it will keep working at 6% what if it quits working completely them what do i do?

A. The best solution for gallbladder pain (usually because of gallbladder stones) is surgery. Removing the gallbladder is a simple surgical procedure that will solve the problem. You should see your family doctor and discuss this idea with him/her.

More discussions about biliary colic
References in periodicals archive ?
One patient with biliary colic developed acute cholecystitis while awaiting surgery.
However, when surgery poses more risk than benefits or if surgical management is refused, oral dissolution therapy may be a helpful alternative, providing patients relief from biliary colic and preventing further formation and accumulation of gallstones while therapy is ongoing.
However, patients who had fewer than three biliary colic episodes in the year before the study were significantly more likely to remain colic free while waiting for surgery than were patients with three or more preoperative colic episodes.
and %) of patients Group A Group B P Biliary colic 74 (76) 42 (69) NS Acute cholecystitis 19 (20) 13 (21) NS Acute pancreatitis 4 (4) 6 (10) NS
presenting with biliary colic, dyspepsia, post-prandial distress, bloating, fat intolerance along with ultrasound findings of cholelithiasis were included in the study using non-probability consecutive sampling.
Biliary colic without gallstones--also known as BD or acalculous cholecystitis--is a functional disorder of the gallbladder or bile duct.
Clinical presentations varied, with biliary colic, nausea and vomiting, and jaundice being most common (Table).
In the observation group, 21 patients (24%) experienced recurrent events, including bile duct stones and cholangitis, acute cholecystitis, or biliary colic.
Angina, atypical angina, and chest pain from biliary colic are much more common than atypical chest pain caused by GERD.
4) Patient presentation can vary from asymptomatic (Most often) to pain in right hypochondrium similar to or superadded with chronic cholecystitis, pain occurring due to hypercontraction of gallbladder or free floating debris causing intermittent biliary colic.
Out of seven conversions, 3 patients had diagnosis of biliary colic /chronic cholecystitis and 2 patients were acute calculous cholecystitis.
One-third will develop symptoms including jaundice, pruritus, biliary colic and recurrent cholangitis related to biliary obstruction.