bile salts


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bile salts

the salt forms of bile acids; for example, taurocholate, glycocholate.

bile salts

Etymology: L, bilis, bile; AS, sealt
a mixture of sodium salts of the bile acids and cholic and chenodeoxycholic acids synthesized in the liver as a derivative of cholesterol. Their low surface tension contributes to the emulsification of fats in the intestine and their absorption from the GI tract.

bile salts

The sodium salts found in bile. Sodium taurocholate and sodium glycocholate. These salts act as emulsifying agents to assist in the absorption of dietary fats.

bile salts

the sodium salts secreted in bile, sodium taurocholate and sodium glycocholate, which greatly lower surface tension and are important in emulsifying fats.

bile

a clear yellow, orange or green fluid produced by the liver. It is concentrated and stored in the gallbladder, and is poured into the small intestine via the bile ducts when needed for digestion. Bile helps in alkalinizing the intestinal contents and plays a role in the digestion and absorption of fat; its chief constitutents are conjugated bile salts, cholesterol, phospholipid, bilirubin and electrolytes. See also bile duct, biliary.

bile acids
steroid acids derived from cholesterol; classified as primary, those synthesized in the liver, e.g. cholic and chenodeoxycholic acid, or secondary, those produced from primary bile acids by intestinal bacteria and returned to the liver by enterohepatic circulation, e.g. deoxycholic and lithocholic acid.
bile acid assay
are used in the diagnosis of liver disease and portacaval shunts when there are increased levels in the blood.
bile lake
bile duct obstruction may cause distention and rupture of biliary canaliculi. Small bile lakes result causing focal hepatic necrosis.
bile passages
bile canaliculi drain into bile ductules and interlobular ducts. These unite to form a series of hepatic ducts which carry the bile to the porta where they unite to form the common hepatic duct. This duct receives a cystic duct from the gallbladder (absent in the horse) and thence becomes the bile duct.
bile peritonitis
leakage of bile from the common bile duct or gallbladder may occur as a result of trauma, including perforation during percutaneous needle biopsy of the liver, and (rarely) erosion from biliary calculi. A chemical peritonitis results and may be fatal unless surgical repair is accomplished.
bile pigment
any one of the coloring matters of the bile; they are bilirubin, biliverdin, bilifuscin, biliprasin, choleprasin, bilihumin and bilicyanin. See also urobilinogen, stercobilin.
bile pleuritis
inflammation of the pleura resulting from perforating thoracic trauma with hepatodiaphragmatic fistula or iatrogenically from percutaneous liver biopsy techniques.
bile reflux
usually refers to movement of bile from the duodenum into the stomach where it may alter the gastric mucosal barrier causing gastritis and ulceration.
white bile
1. bile containing much mucin.
2. bile trapped in obstructed system for a long period and from which pigments have been resorbed.
References in periodicals archive ?
cerevisiae showed favorable results for tests of tolerance to bile salts, changes in temperature, high salt concentrations, additionally to showing a competitive exclusion competence.
Further, KCC-32 displayed potential probiotic characteristics including resistant to low pH, bile salt tolerance, auto-aggregation and hydrophobicity.
Souza said she continues to investigate, focusing now on how the initial insult of acidic bile salts on esophageal epithelium stimulates this inflammatory response.
The resulting failure of bile salts from hepatocytes into bile canaliculi leads to bile salt accumulation in hepatocytes, causing severe hepatocellular damage, and impaired bile flow because of the lack of bile salt secretion in bile.
Vitamin C is used by the enzyme that converts cholesterol to bile salts.
The increased biliary content and fecal excretion of bile acids and sterols suggest that the water-soluble gummy fibers may enhance the breakdown of cholesterol leading to an increased conversion to bile acids and bile salts that are excreted in the alimentary canal.
Apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (ASBT) coordinates re-absorption of bile acids and facilitates their return to the liver via the portal vein.
The gastrointestinal microbiota composition is influenced by bile salts and in turn, bile salts themselves are chemically modified in the gut by bacterial enzymes such as bacterial bile salt hydrolase (BSH).
Fact: Stones reflect a poor and abnormal function of the gall bladder by which the normal ratio of the bile salts to the other substances present in the bile is becoming abnormal and thus the salts will be precipitated lead to sludge and stones formation.
Dietary fibre binds to bile salts and decreases their re-absorption in the colon, thus helping to lower LDL, the bad form of cholesterol.
A number of studies have demonstrated that CS samples can influence bile salts metabolism determining the digestion of lipids in the small intestine.
Chemicals in the bile called bile salts (also often referred to as bile acids) can then build up and 'leak' into the bloodstream.