biguanides


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Related to biguanides: Sulfonylureas

biguanides

Drugs, such as METFORMIN and PHENFORMIN used to treat Type II DIABETES. They are part of the group of oral hypoglycaemic drugs. Biguanides act by reducing the efficiency of ION movement across cell membranes thus interfering with the production of glucose by the liver and reducing the energy yield from glucose used as fuel.

metformin

biguanide agent used to treat diabetes mellitus; in presence of insulin, it decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis and increases peripheral uptake of glucose (i.e. it decreases peripheral insulin resistance); it is used to treat type 2 diabetes in cases that retain some endogenous pancreatic function, obese diabetics, and those whose blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled by sulphonylureas alone; also used in conjunction with sulphonylureas or acarbose or injected insulin or a glitazone or repaglinide; also used to treat some type 1 diabetics where it is used as an adjunct to parenteral (administered) insulin; may be used to treat polycystic ovary disease (these patients typically show insulin resistance, even though not frankly diabetic)

biguanides (bīgwan´īdz),

n.pl orally administered agents used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, which prevents the liver from breaking down glycogen into glucose and increases the sensitivity body tissues have to insulin. See metformin HCl.

biguanides

a class of disinfectants, the most common one being chlorhexidine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Metformin is a biguanide oral antidiabetic agent which is commonly used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus.
TABLE 1: Anti-diabetic Drug Utilization (Individual\Combination) Anti-diabetic Mono- Combination Total drugs Therapy Sulfonylurea 11 119 130 (65%) Biguanide 7 123 130 (65%) Thiazolidinediones 13 43 56 (28%) Acarbose 5 1 6 (3%) Insulin 31 -- 31 (15.
Biguanides have been shown to prevent progression in these patients to frank diabetes.
reported that the use of this biguanide was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer in diabetic patients (18).
Until recently, treatment options were limited to primarily two classifications of drugs: biguanides and sulfonylureas.
Description: propylene glycol (and) formic acid (and) iodopropynyl butylcarbamate (and) polyaminopropyl biguanides
He notes there are several medications on the market to help control Type II diabetes, such as sulfonylureas, which help the pancreas produce more insulin; biguanides, which lessens the amount of glucose the liver produces; and thiazolidinediones, which helps make blood cells more receptive to insulin.
DIABETES MEDICATIONS DRUG CLASS MEDICATION NAMES ACTION(S) (1) Biguanides Metformin --Decreases glucose production by the liver (2) GLP-1 Exenatide, --Increases Insulin secretion receptor Liraglutide --Decreases glucagon secretion * --Increases feeling of fullness (3) DPP-IV Sitagliptin, --Increases Insulin secretion inhibitors Saxagliptin, --Decreases glucagon Linagliptin, secretion Alogliptin (4) SGLT-2 Canagliflozin, --Causes glucose excretion inhibitors Dapagliflozin in urine (5) Sulfonylureas Glyburide, --Increases insulin secretion Glipizide, Glimepiride (6) Insulin Aspart, --Lowers glucose Lispro, Glulisine * Glucagon is secreted by the pancreas when blood sugar is low.
Sulfonylureas and biguanides have been used for the past 50 years for the treatment of DM.
Metformin belongs to a class of medicines known as biguanides, which have been used for decades to treat type two diabetes - the form of the disease that normally affects the middle-aged or elderly.
It is thought that agents that increase the cellular AMP/ATP ratio, such as the antidiabetic biguanides metformin and phenformin, inhibit mTORC1 through AMPK activation of TSC1/2-dependent or -independent mechanisms.