bigamy

(redirected from bigamous)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

bigamy

The act of marrying a second (or a third) person while still married to one’s first spouse.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the government says there are only 1,000 such bigamous or polygamous unions in the UK, the two experienced Lancashire social workers - one of Indian-English heritage and the other with Pakistani origin, said multiple marriages are encouraged by a welfare system which allows a second, third or fourth wife to be treated as a single mother who gets a house and an array of other state payments for herself and her children.
"The article suggested that Commander Dizaei was involved in a bigamous marriage to Mrs Dizaei.
The ambiguity that characterizes the protagonist's sexual orientation (as bigamous, homosexual, transexual, travesti, androgynous, bigendered, chameleon-like) and her reliance on alchemy and supernatural events reflect the author's intention to transgress other boundaries, like those of linguistic and philosophical nature to demonstrate that opposites can find harmony within a single entity (good/evil, angel/ devil, man/woman).
He's a good-looking lad when he ditches the headgear, he makes her laugh and he doesn't have lots of baggage, like a bigamous past and a drink problem.
Run For Your Wife tells the story of a bigamous taxi driver and the double life he leads.
A French bishop married them, but some contemporaries thought their union incestuous as well as bigamous. There was nothing very unusual about it at the time, but Pope Urban II excommunicated Philip in 1095 and the anathema was renewed by his successor Paschal II.
The self-willed car accident represents a subconscious desire to bring together his two wives, his two platonic though bigamous complements--and achieve complete wholeness at last.
The fifth chapter connects Manley's allegorical caricatures of Whig lords and ladies, The New Atalantis (1709), the fact of Manley's own entrapment in a bigamous marriage, and the reality of Muslim women possessing property rights that vastly exceeded those of English women, to show how Manley's "repeated scenes of polygamy" serve not "to displace the source of patriarchal oppression onto other cultures, but to locate it at the heart of English culture" (116).
Roderick Sangster, whose last known address was the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Trinity Street, Chester, was found guilty of entering into a bigamous marriage by a jury at Warwick Crown Court in November.
On February 27, 1875, what appears to be a bigamous marriage took place at Sculcoates Register Office, when Charlotte Ann Dickson, of New George Street, married John Dales Robinson, of Green Lane.