bicameral

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bicameral

 [bi-kam´er-al]
having two chambers or cavities.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'er-ăl),
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bicameral

/bi·cam·er·al/ (bi-kam´er-al) having two chambers or cavities.

bicameral

(bī-kăm′ər-əl)
adj.
Medicine Composed of or having two chambers, as an abscess divided by a septum.

bi·cam′er·al·ism n.

bicameral

[bī·kam′ər·əl]
Etymology: L, bis, twice + camera, vaulted chamber
having two chambers.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two cham-bers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]

bicameral

having two chambers or cavities.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, bicameralism is not limited to federal countries, about one third of unitary states too have bicameral legislatures.
at 944-48, and because it violated the constitutional requirement of bicameralism, id.
In the 20th century, the early comparative works on bicameralism attempted to derive a theory by combining the historical record with the then-contemporary comparative experience.
Instead, defenders of bicameralism usually argue that the advantage of an upper house is that it "slows down the legislative process, renders abrupt change difficult, forces myopic legislators to have second thoughts, and thereby minimizes arbitrariness and injustice in governmental action.
One should first be reminded of the recent jurisprudence of the Constitutional Court in the sense of traditions of Romanian parliamentarism (Gutan, 2013) that consecrates bicameralism and the advantages of this structure to the legislative.
Legislative vetoes were the provisions that Congress, in the wake of the New Deal, routinely put into legislation in order to allow either one or both houses of Congress to vote down a particular agency action without going through the bicameralism and presentment procedures specified by the text of the Constitution.
Bicameralism is an instance of there being a division of power as well as checks and balances.
The question is whether the authorizing statute of EPA or FDIC or anything else permits that kind of self-funding, and then that's the fundamental question, and Congress, of course, is always free to withdraw that by a statute that satisfies itself, bicameralism and presentment, see Chadha.
The Constitution plainly requires that both houses of Congress must "pass" a bill in order for it to become a law, (26) but does this bicameralism requirement, set forth in Article I, Section 7, encompass a duty on the part of both houses to take the exact same vote?
71) Under these procedures, a bill may "become a Law" only after traversing the bicameralism and presentment requirements.
Our unusually complex structure of government--one that combines separation of powers, bicameralism, and federalism--not only embeds numerous "veto points" in the legislative process, but frustrates accountability by making it nearly impossible for voters to know whom to blame or reward for public policy.
In other words, Congress was not respecting bicameralism because it gave legislative powers to one committee.