bicameral

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bicameral

 [bi-kam´er-al]
having two chambers or cavities.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'er-ăl),
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bicameral

(bī-kăm′ər-əl)
adj.
Medicine Composed of or having two chambers, as an abscess divided by a septum.

bi·cam′er·al·ism n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two chambers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bi·cam·er·al

(bī-kam'ĕr-ăl)
Having two cham-bers; denoting especially an abscess divided by a more or less complete septum.
[bi- + L. camera, chamber]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Justice Jackson's first category of executive power, following one of the suggested routes will provide the executive agency with the argument of an affirmative grant of authority that aligns with the basic principles of bicameralism, presentment, and a valid delegation of power to the agency.
I have been using bicameralism as a metaphor for thinking through the issue of human and AI consciousness merging while hinting at the politics.
There have been a few attempts to come up with a theory for bicameralism. This was attempted by largely Anglo scholars.
As noted earlier, rather than attack or defend bicameralism, we will argue in favour of attributing to a democratically reconstituted Senate the primary responsibility of reviewing the constitutionality of legislation.
Though at a doctrinarian level the controversy bicameralism--unicameralism with regard to the Romanian constitutional system is still very much real and continuous --arguments with concern to bicameralism (for further details see Attila, 2007: 146-54; Muraru and Muraru, 2005: 1-10; Tocqueville, 1992: 136-137; Duculescu, 2000: 19-24; Sartori, 2008: 249-256) being advanced both pro, i.e.
respectability of bicameralism and independence among the branches.
"Under the current system of perfect bicameralism, the Senate has virtually equal powers with the lower house but is elected through regional votes rather than a single national ballot.
To implement his preferred policies, the first president faces the full gauntlet of checks and balances--from the formal requirements of bicameralism and presentment to the modern congressional vetogates.
Thus he despised bicameralism, and rejected checks and balances in constitution-making, not because he had any real insight into how laws should be made, but because he did not.
Another type of institution that has been studied is bicameralism, regarding which Roger Congleton (2006) reports that political decisions seem to be more in line with the median voter's long-run preferences in bicameral systems.
The third chapter is devoted to the monarchiens, who advocated bicameralism and the absolute royal veto during the early stages of the French Revolution.