bookworm

(redirected from bibliophile)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to bibliophile: Diastasis recti

bookworm

A popular term for an inveterate, voracious, indiscriminate or “addicted” book reader.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The shelves are brimming with extra-special titles for bibliophiles. If there's a discerning reader on your gift list, check out our must-have recommendations below.
For the bibliophile, it doesn't get any better than this.
I grew up a bibliophile. My late dad was one and so his collection of books, fiction and non-fiction were my favorite fare.
In which 1999 Roman Polanski thriller did Frank Langella star alongside Johnny Depp in the role of a bibliophile? Frank Langella - see Question 10
A wealthy publisher and bibliophile, Day photographed himself and others--often male nudes--in stark scenes evoking Christian, classical, and mythological characters.
Bibliophile Warner (English, Le Moyne College, New York) introduces his study of another bibliophile's work, as follows: "This is an annotated translation of John Bale's (1495-1563) Latin records of Tudor-era works culled from his massive catalogue of British, Scottish, and Irish authors that he published in two parts while living as a religious exile in Basel, Switzerland." Warner continues with some details of the obstacles posed by Bale's many inconsistent and inaccurate records.
It added: "Gordon Brown was the most bibliophile leader since Churchill, while Blair was no slouch with the pen himself.
Founded in 1884, it was named after Jean Grolier, Viscount d' Aguisy, a leading French bibliophile of the Renaissance.
With little of real interest for the bibliophile it is rather lightweight and unfocused - a far cry from the glory days when Anais Nin and Lawrence Durrell roamed the shelves.
You don't have to be a collector to envy the owners of page after page of beautiful pieces--Edward Gorey's watercolour of a bibliophile in his library; one of 240 copies of Edgar Allen Poe's Le Corbeau, this one signed by Manet and Mallarme; and three items associated with Virginia Woolf, one the outstanding Francis Dodd charcoal drawing, and another Woolf's unique binding of The House of Seven Gables, made for her nephew Julian Bell.
With the founding, beginning in the 1820s, of bibliophile societies, revues, publishing houses and bookstores, bibliomania, for the first time, acquired its own institutions.
The law extended both timespans by two decades, prompting a legal challenge by Eric Eldred, a bibliophile in New Hampshire who wanted to put digitized editions of old books online.