bibliomania


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bib·li·o·ma·ni·a

(bib'lē-ō-mā'nē-ă),
Morbidly intense desire to collect and possess books, especially rare books.
[G. biblion, book, + mania, frenzy]

bibliomania

A morbid preoccupation for acquiring books.

bibliomania

(bĭb″lē-ō-mā′nē-ă) [Gr. biblion, book, + mania, madness]
An obsession with the collecting of books.
References in periodicals archive ?
La bibliomania--es decir la condena que hacen el siglo XVIII y XIX de la lectura de novelas debido a su asociacion con y denuncia como enfermedad, como un hambre incontrolable de sensaciones--le abre a Littau la posibilidad de formular su tesis principal: "la bibliomania es parte de un malestar cultural mas amplio, especificamente asociado a la modernidad: la sobreestimulacion sensorial" (2006: 5).
There is something half-celestial in that infantine Combination of intense feeling with the vulgarest Trusims, the merest mouldy Scraps, of generalizing Morality." (47) Perhaps with the bibliomania of the book's owner in mind, he dubs its author "honest Murthereo-Maniacal John Reynolds." (48)
(17) Karin Littau, Teorias de la lectura libros, cuerpos y bibliomania (Buenos Aires: Manantial, 2008): 42.
(34) Arnold Hunt, 'Private Libraries in the Age of Bibliomania', in The Cambridge History of Libraries in Britain and Ireland, 3 vols (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006), II: 1640-1850, eds Giles Mandelbrote and K.
La bibliomania, asi como la difusion de una verdadera "fiebre lectora," forma parte, como apunta Karin Littau, de "un malaise cultural mas vasto, vinculado especificadamente a la modernidad: la sobrestimulacion sensorial" (23).
Thus Owen points out that" resentment flows just beneath the surface: she implicitly compares her husband's passion for collection to the bibliomania of Emperor Yuan of the Liang and Emperor Yang of the Sui, both exemplars of bad government its dire consequences, both representatives of destructive distortions of value" (Remembrance 98).This conclusion Owen assimilates one's husband to a bad emperor may somehow be unacceptable for Chinese readers, since this is contrary to the mainstream of Chinese traditional ethics.
The practice of extra-illustration, a type of bibliomania, expresses one pre-Modernist response to this tension.
Under Collectors, various individuals are investigated: Viscount Conway (1594-1655) and his vast collection; James Fraser (1645-1731) and his generous benefactions; Titus Wheatcroft (1679-1762) and his library's catalogue; James West (1703-1772) and the sale of his books; Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) and bibliomania; and Thomas Cassidy (died 1873) and his recusant collection.
Project Gutenberg, Google Books, Bartleby.com, Bibliomania, and ManyBooks.net are on his list of "generous projects [that] are repositories of great works." However, he adds that scholars, students, and researchers need more when accessing public domain material.