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bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]
References in periodicals archive ?
Healthcare disparities arising from unrecognised and unmanaged unconscious biases may negatively impact on medical derision-making and clinical interactions with patients and colleagues.
As the narrative building gets increasingly intense we are opening up to our biases and aligning our political identities.
Being self-aware of one's biases could lead to a 12% increase in overall retirement savings -- or as much as a 70% increase using estimates that account for classical measurement error, the study finds.
Overall, eliminating both biases from the sample would lead to a 12 percent increase in retirement savings, according to the authors' estimates.
In each case he presents, there is a deliberate attempt at least to identify, if not discuss, alternate explanations and influential factors not relating to cognitive biases. For example, in the case of U.S.
Gary Cook: Subtle and often unrecognized biases can distort the director selection process.
Attentional biases for alcohol cues in heavy and light social drinkers: the roles of initial orienting and maintained attention.
Awareness of personal biases is a central component of multicultural competency (Sue & Sue, 2003).
The estimated biases performed very well in tracking their true values even though the biases were significant and with sudden changes, except that there were relatively larger deviations at the time around 60 min when the magnitudes of the external disturbance were significant.
Biases take us unknowingly away from the "truth" in research.
I suggest that coaches first try to identify any undershoot (or energy minimization) biases present in the skills practiced.
In an earlier commentary, more to the point, the editor of The Lancet (Horton 1997) argued that financial conflicts "may not be [more] influential" than biases and that "interpretations of scientific data will always be refracted through the experiences and biases of the authors." He contended that disqualifying researchers from writing editorials or reviews because of their "associations" with industry "may harm flee discussion in science." Horton (1997) concluded that "[t]he only way to minimize bias among interpretations is to allow maximum dialogue from all parties, irrespective of their interests." Making government conflict or bias rules more exclusionary will not serve that end.