bias


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bias

 [bi´as]
1. (in a measurement process) systematic error.
2. any influence or action at any stage of a study that systematically distorts the findings.
3. (of a statistical estimator) the difference between the expected value of the estimator and the true parameter value.

bi·as

(bī'-as),
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

There is no imputation of prejudice, partisanship, or other subjective or emotional factor such as an investigator's desire to achieve a particular outcome. More than 100 varieties of bias have been described, but all fall into a small number of classes: 1. Systematic one-sided variation of measurements from the true value. SYN systematic error, instrumental error 2. Variation of statistical summary measures (means, rates, measures of association) from their true values as a result of systematic variation of measurements, other flaws in data collection, or flaws in study design or analysis. 3. Deviation of inferences from the truth as a result of flaws in study design, data collection, or the analysis or interpretation of results. 4. A tendency of procedures in study design, data collection, analysis, interpretation, review or publication, to yield results or conclusions that depart from the truth. 5. Prejudice leading to the conscious or subconscious selection of study procedures that depart from the truth in a particular direction, or to one-sidedness in interpretation of results. This last form of bias can arise as a result of shoddy scientific methods or deliberate misrepresentation of the truth by investigators.

bias

[bī′əs]
Etymology: MFr, biais
1 an oblique or a diagonal line.
2 a prejudiced or subjective attitude.
3 (in statistics) the distortion of statistical findings from the true value. There can be many kinds of bias; some may be caused by the sampling process, but bias can be caused by other factors.
4 (in electronics) a voltage applied to an electronic device, such as a vacuum tube or a transistor, to control operating limits. See also detection bias.

bias

Epidemiology Deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to such systematic deviation; any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that are systematically incorrect

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review of data that can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bi·as

(bī'ăs)
1. Systematic discrepancy between a measurement and the true value; may be constant or proportionate and may adversely affect test results.
2. Any trend in the collection, analysis, interpretation, publication, or review, which can lead to conclusions that differ systematically from the truth; deviation of results or inferences from the truth, or processes leading to deviation.
[Fr. biais, obliquity, perh. fr. L. bifax, two-faced]

bias,

n in statistics, the systematic distortion of a statistic caused by a particular sampling process.

bias

any systematic error in the design, conduct or analysis of a study which results in estimates which depart from true values. An unbiased study is free from systematic error. Many types of bias have been named, but three general types can be identified, selection bias, information bias and confounding. Selection bias is a systematic error in a study caused by the individuals selected into the study being different from the entire target population in an important way. See also berkson's bias. Information bias is a systematic error in a study caused by errors in the data which are collected in the study, or in the analysis of the data.
References in periodicals archive ?
The more you know and the more you care, the more bias you're going to see.
We're sitting on a treasure trove of social media engagement data, which can now be used to predict the performance of influencer campaigns in a way that's simply never been done before," said Bill Sussman, CEO of Collective Bias.
For example a HIGH DPI is less of an indicator of a bias if the SP% is also HIGH but a HIGH DPI with a LOW SP% would imply a notable bias.
He also points out that for the sake of ease and simplicity, bias should not be limited by operational definitions like proportional front-page coverage.
Bias can affect treatment in a number of ways, researchers said.
7 percent were motivated by sexual-orientation bias.
Bias Random variation Systematic variation Unsystematic caused by Caused by known forces unknown forces New or unanticipated Always present Unpredictable Range is predictable
If the escape routes are NSEW, the layer-biased routing will block the routing of those escapes in the opposite bias (FIGURE 3).
There are those who have far too heavy a bias, be it in their religion or any other pursuit that they lose sight of the "jack".
This bias stems from the fact that the majority of military organizations and the systems that support them are partitioned into two levels: the operational and the tactical.
I find it interesting that about half of the blacks taking the test also have a "pro-white bias.
Basketball offers another example of the presence of the undershoot bias -the idea that the most missed shots will hit the front of the rim rather than the back.