beta-carotene


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beta-carotene

A natural red-orange fat-soluble retinoid provitamin metabolised to vitamin A in the body; it is an antioxidant and free-radical scavenger, protecting cells against oxidation damage linked to cancer; it is present in fresh fruits and vegetables, and has immunostimulatory activity; increased BC consumption is associated with a decreased risk of bladder, colon, lung, skin cancer and cancer cell growth in vitro.

Health benefits
Minor protection against heart disease, strokes and effects of ageing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Porter's five forces model in the report provides insights into the competitive rivalry, supplier and buyer positions in the market and opportunities for the new entrants in the global beta-carotene market over the period of 2017 to 2025.
Zagajewski et al., "Different effect of beta-carotene on proliferation of prostate cancer cells," Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA)-Molecular Basis of Disease, vol.
Other investigators have reported that the beta-carotene content in cooked orange-fleshed sweet potatoes was 67 mg per kg to 160 mg per kg, which was similar to the researchers' ingredients.
The bioavailability and VA equivalency of beta-carotene in biofortified cassava was assessed in two studies in US women (Table 1) [3, 4].
It was assumed that AFB1 could be responsible for oxidative stress related apoptosis in MDCK cells and the beta-carotene may act as regulator of cellular pathways involved in apoptosis by adjusting ROS production within the cells.
Bausch + Lomb, which supplied supplements for both AREDS trials, still sells the AREDS1 formula with beta-carotene (left) or with lutein in its place (not shown).
The team found that orange-fleshed honeydew had significantly higher beta-carotene concentrations than cantaloupe, but the two melon types had similar beta-carotene bioaccessibilities.
Increased intake of beta-carotene, vitamin C, or magnesium was associated with better hearing at both speech and high frequencies.
The nanostructure protects beta-carotene against degradation and it modifies its sorption in the body.
Furthermore, a statistically significant reduction of 18% in risk of progression to advanced AMD for patients receiving lutein and zeaxanthin in the absence of beta-carotene, when compared with patients receiving an AREDS formulation with beta-carotene (and not receiving L+Z), was reported.
In the present work, the model equations for simultaneous determination of beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in hexane layer extract of lycopene/[beta]-carotene mixtures have been derived.
Hammad went on to say, “We needed to determine if beta-carotene is actually helping our patients and if lutein, zeaxanthin or omega-3 fatty acids could reduce risk of developing AMD.”