beta-amyloid


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beta-amyloid

(bā′tə-ăm′ə-loid′, bē′-)
n.
A protein fragment formed by the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein that aggregates into deposits characteristically found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Also called amyloid beta-peptide, amyloid beta-protein, beta-amyloid peptide, beta-amyloid protein.

beta-amyloid

A4, β—amyloid Neurology A 4 kD polypeptide encoded on chromosome 21 arising from altered processing of amyloid precursor protein, an integral membrane glycoprotein secreted as a truncated carboxyl-terminal molecule; BA forms plaques in the brains of Pts with Alzheimer's disease–AD, Down syndrome, infectious encephalopathy, cerebral amyloid angiopathy; BA is found in skin, intestine, adrenal gland. See Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid, Presenilin. Cf Alpha2-macroglobulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
(https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/326001.php) Using mass spectrometry on blood samples , the new test detects the presence of two forms of the beta-amyloid protein: beta-amyloid 42 and beta-amyloid 40.
This was due to the action of beta-amyloid molecules, which blocked glutamate transport out of the synaptic cleft.
Although earlier studies have shown a relationship between social engagement and cognitive decline, scientists have not fleshed out the relationship between these two factors and levels of beta-amyloid in the brain.
Both beta-amyloid and tau clusters are associated with a higher risk of developing dementia, though not everyone with protein tangles goes on to develop symptoms of dementia.
Betaclear will soon be one of the biggest drivers of the country's medical tourism, Santos said, when it becomes the first country to deploy an FDA-approved and commercially available rapid beta-amyloid detoxification procedure.
While acute sleep deprivation is known to elevate brain beta-amyloid levels in mice, less is known about the impact of sleep deprivation on beta-amyloid accumulation in the human brain.
In the new study, researchers at KCL found that when beta-amyloid destroys a synapse, the nerve cells make more beta-amyloid -- driving yet more synapses to be destroyed.
They then analysed this data to see if there was a correlation between participants who reported daytime sleepiness or napping and whether they scored positive for beta-amyloid deposition in their brains.
They found beta-amyloid increases of about 5 percent after losing a night of sleep in brain regions including the thalamus and hippocampus, regions especially vulnerable to damage in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease.
In the study, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was associated with increased accumulation of beta-amyloid, an important biomarker of AD that manifests in early preclinical stages, wrote first author Diego Z.
'We know that sleep is necessary to clear toxins and beta-amyloid in the brain,' said study author Prashanthi Vemuri, a research faculty member at the Mayo Clinic, where the study was done.