beta-adrenergic blocker


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beta-adrenergic blocker

Betablocker (beta-adrenergic blocker)

A class of drugs that bind beta-adrenergic receptors and thereby decrease the ability of the body's own natural epinephrine to bind to those receptors, leading to inhibition of various processes in the body's sympathetic system. Betablockers can slow the heart rate, constrict airways in the lungs, lower blood pressure, and reduce aqueous secretion by ciliary tissues in the eye.
Mentioned in: Glaucoma
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of beta-adrenergic blockers in this situation, with the negative inotropic effect, may precipitate cardiovascular collapse by reducing cardiac output.
(23) Beta-adrenergic blockers have been shown to promote weight gain and prevent weight loss, especially in patients who have both hypertension and diabetes.
Some medications commonly used to reduce blood pressure are diuretics, angiotension-converting enzyme inhibitors, beta-adrenergic blockers, calcium antagonists and alpha-adrenergic blockers.
Many clinical drugs that against cardiovascular diseases have exhibited antioxidant effects; these drugs simultaneously inhibit endothelial adhesion molecule expression, such as aspirin, probucol, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and gamma ligands, calcium channel blockers, beta-adrenergic blockers, etc.
Use of typical therapeutic drugs for HF prior to intervention at the HFTC-CCPRC was similar among both groups, with marked underuse of aspirin (21.7%), aldosterone antagonists (27.9%), beta-adrenergic blockers (59.0%), and angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (73.0%).