beta wave


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to beta wave: theta wave

be·ta rhyth·m

a wave pattern in the electroencephalogram in the frequency band of 18-30 Hz.
Synonym(s): beta wave

beta wave

n.
An electrical oscillation occurring in the human brain at a frequency of about 13 to 30 hertz as recorded on an electroencephalogram, associated with a state of alert wakefulness. Also called beta rhythm.

beta wave

one of several types of brain waves, characterized by relatively low voltage and a frequency of more than 13 Hz. Beta waves are the "busy waves" of the brain, recorded by electroencephalograph from the frontal and the central areas of the cerebrum when the patient is awake and alert with eyes open. Also called beta rhythm.Compare alpha wave,delta wave,theta wave.

beta wave

An electroencephalographic deflection. Its frequency is between 18 and 30 Hz. See: beta rhythm
See also: wave
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, absolute mid beta waves increased in the same regions (left frontal and right parietal) and these changes might be enhancing the alertness state.
Stroop Beta Waves: Initial beta waves recorded during Stroop testing ranged from 11.
Persons who abuse alcohol chronically have been found to have lower levels of alpha and theta waves and an excess of beta waves, perhaps contributing to use of alcohol to raise levels of those brain waves to a more pleasant state of relaxation (Peniston & Kulkowsky, 1989).
Often increasing low beta waves using a sensory motor-response protocol will help migraines and some seizure symptoms.
Once the rats mastered the task, their brainwaves slowed to almost a quarter of their initial frequency, becoming beta waves.
Beta: Beta waves are the busy waves that usually allow a person to be focused and intentional.
Beta waves are very-high frequency and are used when a person concentrates.
In a 1996 study, co-workers given a 15-minute massage while sitting in a chair had lower levels of alpha and beta waves - indicating more mental alertness - than colleagues who simply sat quietly in their chairs and tried to relax.
She said once a person learns to control the alpha and beta waves, the "control signal" can then be used to program anything from lighting, to music, to motors.