beta emitter


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beta emitter

A radioisotope which decays by emitting an electron particle. Beta emitters are labelled as “soft” emitters if the electron is of low energy and has a short penetration distance, or “hard” if it is high-energy and with a great penetrating distance.
References in periodicals archive ?
One day, doctors may even be able to select from a family of beta emitters with different energies--and therapeutic ranges--to tailor the radiation's reach to a particular cancer's size.
In addition, in 2015, the beta emitters segment is expected to account for the largest share of the North American therapeutic nuclear medicine/radiopharmaceuticals market, owing to heavy funding for research on beta emitters, new therapeutic radioisotopes, and reimbursement policies in favor of using radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy.
Alpha emitters deposit higher energy over a significantly shorter distance versus beta emitters, providing single-cell kill while leaving normal surrounding tissue unharmed.
As part of his studies on irradiated materials, the DMN adopts a measuring gas release aimed to evaluate the kinetics of gas release in increments of temperature maintenance with time measurement the real release samples irradiated beta emitters / gamma can be contaminants.
This isotope has tremendous potential to take up market share of beta emitters and brachytherapy.
The final standards are: combined radium 226/228 of 5 picocuries per liter; a gross alpha standard for all alphas of 15 5 picocuries per liter, not including radon and uranium; and a combined standard of 4 millerems per year for beta emitters.
The radioisotopes used on these patients included yttrium-90, rhenium-186, and erbium-169, all of which are beta emitters but which have different penetration distances in soft tissue.
The result of this direct detection breakthrough is that researchers can now achieve true quantification of radioisotope uptake for all common beta emitters -- C-14, S-35, P-33, P-32, and others.