best interest standard

best interest standard

The ethical requirement that people who care for others will do so in good faith, placing their assessment of that person's best interests above their own. The standard particularly applies to the care of incompetent or dependent people, e.g., infants or patients who are so ill that they cannot make decisions on their own.
References in periodicals archive ?
Financial planners, acting with a fiduciary or clients' best interest standard, are contributing significantly to the success of their clients' lives.
While many in the financial services industry claim that they support a best interest standard, they argue that the re-proposed rule is unworkable.
When substituted judgment fails to supply clear answers, the best interest standard comes into play.
The best interest standard described earlier provides legal leverage for HIT adoption within Medicaid as a means of advancing the timeliness and quality of health care.
In using the best interest standard, social workers may be influenced by peers, supervisors, their organizational context, and the larger sociocultural arena, and this may restrict their decision making.
The court repudiated the best interest standard finding that it was inappropriate to prove that it was in the child's best interest to remain with the grandparents.
at 17 (emphasis added), its tempered best interest standard is quite different from the substituted judgment standard, which is based solely on the surrogate's determination of the patient's own preferences.
The best interest standard always requires the court to assess many facets of a child's life, development, and well-being.
In Collinsworth, the court noted that to apply the best interest standard in ruling on a proposed name change, a court should give effort to the same factors as in custody cases.
As a result, this case must revert to a best interest standard of proxy decision-making.