glasses

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glasses

 [glas´ez]
lenses arranged in a frame holding them in the proper position in front of the eyes, as an aid to vision. Called also eyeglasses and spectacles.
bifocal glasses glasses with bifocal lenses; see also bifocal glasses.
trifocal glasses glasses with trifocal lenses.

glass·es

(glas'ĕz),
1. Synonym(s): spectacles
2. Lenses for correcting refractive errors in the eyes.

glasses

(glăs′ĭz)
n.
A pair of lenses mounted in a frame and used to correct refractive errors of the eyes or to protect the eyes.

spec·ta·cles

(spek'tă-kĕlz)
Lenses set in a frame that holds them in front of the eyes, used to correct errors of refraction or to protect the eyes. The parts of the spectacles are: the lenses; the bridge between the lenses, resting on the nose; the rims or frames, encircling the lenses; the sides or temples that pass on either side of the head to the ears; the bows, the curved extremities of the temples; and the shoulders, short bars attached to the rims or the lenses and jointed with the sides.
Synonym(s): eyeglasses, glasses.
[L. specto, pp. -atus, to watch, observe]

spectacles 

An optical appliance consisting of a pair of ophthalmic lenses mounted in a frame or rimless mount, resting on the nose and held in place by sides extending towards or over the ears. Syn. eyeglass frame; eyeglasses; eyewear (colloquial); glasses; spectacle frame. See acetone; pantoscopic angle; retroscopic angle; angling; bridge; clipover; eczema; endpiece; eyesize; front; hinge; lens washer; lorgnette; mount; pad; plastic; rim; side; spectacle frame markings; sunglasses; temple; tortoiseshell.
aphakic spectacles Spectacles mounted with aphakic lenses used to compensate the loss of optical power resulting from a cataract extraction when no intraocular lens implant has been inserted. Syn. cataract glasses. See aphakic lens.
billiards spectacles Spectacles incorporating joints that enable the wearer to adjust the angle of the sides (British Standard).
folding spectacles Spectacles that are hinged at the bridge and in the sides, so as to fold with the two lenses in apposition.
half-eye spectacles A pair of spectacles for near vision, designed so that the lenses cover only half of the field of view, usually the lower half (Fig. S10). Syn. half-eyes.
hemianopic spectacles Spectacles incorporating a device that provides a lateral displacement of one or both fields of view. The device is usually a prism such as a Fresnel Press-On prism, which is placed over the blind (hemianopic) side of the visual field. A mirror system may also be used. The view within that side of the field is imaged on the seeing side of the visual field of the eye.
industrial spectacles Spectacles made with plastic or safety glass and solid frame, sometimes with side shields. They are used in industrial occupations where there are possible hazards to the eye. See Fig. S6; safety glass; goggles; safety lens.
library spectacles A plastic spectacle frame with heavyweight front and sides. Syn. library frame.
magnifying spectacles Spectacles containing lenses of high convex power (+10 D or higher) used for near vision.
orthopaedic spectacles Spectacles with attachments designed to relieve certain anatomical deformities such as entropion, ptosis, etc. See Horner's syndrome.
pinhole spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having one or more small apertures. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision (e.g. corneal scar). See stenopaeic spectacles; low vision.
recumbent spectacles Spectacles intended to be used while recumbent. They usually incorporate a prism that deflects a beam of light through approximately 90º while keeping the image erect. See yoke prisms.
reversible spectacles Spectacles that are designed to be worn with either lens before either eye.
rimless spectacles Spectacles without rims, the lenses being fastened to the frame by screws, clamps or similar devices. See lens groove; rim.
stenopaeic spectacles Spectacles fitted with opaque discs having a slit. They are used as an aid in certain types of low vision. See stenopaeic disc; pinhole spectacles; low vision.
supra spectacles Spectacles in which the lenses are held in position by thin nylon threads attached to the rims. See lens groove; rim.
telescopic spectacles See telescopic lens.
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectaclesenlarge picture
Fig. S10 Half-eye spectacles

Patient discussion about glasses

Q. My myopic son is wearing power glasses. Are there any other nutritional supplements to support eye sight? My myopic son is wearing power glasses from the age of 2 years. His power is not very high yet but the rate of his eye power is doubling every year. Doctor had given him some medicines and had told him to have lots of carrots. We are giving him carrot juice every day. But soon he stopped taking it for some months. But he is having juice now but I wish to know are there any other nutritional supplements to support eye sight?

A. eating carrots can help people who suffers from vitamin A or beta-carotene deficiency. which leads to poor night vision. but that's it. there is no reason to eat tremendous amounts of carrots, there are food supplements that will help you achieve it without becoming orange. anyway, getting too much vitamin A can be toxic.
here is a "snopes" about it-
http://www.snopes.com/food/ingredient/carrots.asp

More discussions about glasses
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