benign

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benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

/be·nign/ (bĕ-nīn´) not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

[binīn′]
Etymology: L, benignus, kind
(of a tumor) noncancerous and therefore not a direct threat to life, even though treatment eventually may be required for health or cosmetic reasons. See also benign neoplasm. Compare malignant.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

benign

non-malignant, non-invasive and non-threatening

benign,

adj noncancerous; descriptive term for tumors, moles, and growths.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign (bēnīn´),

adj a condition that, untreated or with symptomatic therapy, will not become life threatening. It is used particularly in relation to tumors, which may be benign or malignant. They do not invade surrounding tissues and do not metastasize to other parts of the body. The word is slightly imprecise, as some can, due to mass effect, cause life-threatening complications.

benign

not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign enzootic paresis
see porcine viral encephalomyelitis.
benign fibrillators
horses with a history of poor performance in races which suffer an attack of atrial fibrillation during or immediately after a race which soon recovers spontaneously so that the abnormality often goes undetected.
benign footrot
occurs under very wet conditions. Caused by Dichelobacter nodosus of low virulence. There is dermatitis of the interdigital skin and minimal underrunning of horn at the heel. See also interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, we examined how perceived risk affects the relationship between benign envy and risk taking, hypothesizing that benignly envious people would seek risk, as they perceive less threat in decisions involving risks than maliciously envious people do.
with the rest of the vocabulary so they may rub benignly against each
Renata Lucas works on an institutional scale and with unmistakable institutional ambition, but like that of certain other Brazilian artists whose work has gained both critical traction and market currency in the US over the past decade--Cildo Meireles and Helio Oiticica, for example--some of Lucas's most provocative work is, owing to its benignly threatening nature, completely untenable in the context of a major American museum.
That use of the species came to an end when epidemiologists realized that the bacterium was showing up in wounds, and not benignly.
Recently, a gaggle of silly students leapt fully clothed into the campus pool in what has been termed the "Modesty Pool Jump," which I suspect the administration looked on benignly.
You can be sure that the so-called moderate Arab states are not benignly sitting aside and watching this.
FX's far funnier ``It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia'' managed to make that plot line wickedly funny; here it's handled fairly benignly.
Alvarez evaluates Palafox by focusing on the times in which he lived, concluding that Palafox was influenced by both his experiences in Spain and the environment in Mexico, which taken together influenced how he thought Spain could most effectively and benignly govern New Spain.
More benignly, would-be saviors of youths also strove to make it possible for them to spend time in natural surroundings outside city centers, whether as members of clubs that engaged in outdoor activities, as visitors to holiday camps, or as emigrants to rural areas.
Home interior design magazines are filled with images such as sunlight-flooded rec-rooms with clean white walls, pink-checked children sprawled on the floor with a Labrador retriever, parents benignly looking on as they relax, maybe in a Jacuzzi surrounded by immaculate white carpeting.
After feeding more or less benignly for 17 years on shallow tree roots, all the nymphs in a brood burrow upward in late spring.
None of the industry folks present said the first thing about the strides made to reduce harmful processes, improve recyclability, or investigate new materials capable of benignly going from "cradle-to-cradle.