benign

(redirected from benignly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

/be·nign/ (bĕ-nīn´) not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

[binīn′]
Etymology: L, benignus, kind
(of a tumor) noncancerous and therefore not a direct threat to life, even though treatment eventually may be required for health or cosmetic reasons. See also benign neoplasm. Compare malignant.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

benign

non-malignant, non-invasive and non-threatening

benign,

adj noncancerous; descriptive term for tumors, moles, and growths.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign (bēnīn´),

adj a condition that, untreated or with symptomatic therapy, will not become life threatening. It is used particularly in relation to tumors, which may be benign or malignant. They do not invade surrounding tissues and do not metastasize to other parts of the body. The word is slightly imprecise, as some can, due to mass effect, cause life-threatening complications.

benign

not malignant; not recurrent; favorable for recovery.

benign enzootic paresis
see porcine viral encephalomyelitis.
benign fibrillators
horses with a history of poor performance in races which suffer an attack of atrial fibrillation during or immediately after a race which soon recovers spontaneously so that the abnormality often goes undetected.
benign footrot
occurs under very wet conditions. Caused by Dichelobacter nodosus of low virulence. There is dermatitis of the interdigital skin and minimal underrunning of horn at the heel. See also interdigital dermatitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Which brings us to Jeff Koons, who's amazingly still getting media mileage out of his benignly robotic character "Jeff Koons" (think Andy Kaufman's "Latka" as a Teletubby).
The influences that be nodded benignly at Paul Broadhurst during his outward journey at Woburn yesterday and he reached the turn in 33, writes Michael Blair.
is both ingeniously simple and benignly narcissistic: British comic Dave Gorman set out to meet everyone he could with his own name - at least 54 of them, in response to a drunken bet he made with a pal.
It is principally the skies that establish the scenes as landscapes--and these are clearly art-full, their whorls and eddies bouncing off the grain of Artschwager's fibrously patterned supports while also nodding benignly in the directions, perhaps, of van Gogh, Albert Pinkham Ryder, and other more shadowy models.
PAUL INCE stood in the middle of Valencia airport, his eyes benignly fixed on a group of reporters bracing themselves to ask that question.
Among Sherman's models in this work, furthermore, is pornography, surely the genre that inspired the pose of the silicone-breasted doll who lies on her back, smiling benignly while spreading her thighs with her hands.
The Viceroy lolls on his divan with a tame lion in place of a cushion and smiles benignly as the heads of his attendants are lopped off in the market place.
This causes some very uncompelling friction - Matt (Saget) shares with his classes benignly embarrassing information about his daughter, Sarah (Kat Dennings), who frets and fumes and berates him, only for the poor dunce to go and reveal something else.
If even the benignly utopian mystique of Joseph Beuys seemed hard to swallow, what would we have made of the queasier excesses of the Viennese?
Then we are supposed to smile benignly at their affectations in the manner of that queer cove Lucinda Lambton, all crushed velvet and smooth vowels dancing in orgiastic ecstacy over this country's grumbling ruins - and that includes her husband Peregrin e Worsthorne.
It seems the skill of delivering less good news benignly is beyond them.
It is perfectly understandable that the people of an historically oppressed and impoverished nation harbour resentment and this often manifests itself in what some interpret as haughty, arrogant confrontational rhetoric but which is in effect a purely defensive mechanism to hide not so much "hurt pride", but to hide deep emotional hurt that other people could do such things to us while benignly and paternalistically patting us on the back with patronising simulated affection.