benign

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benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
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As benign envy promotes improvement motivation, benignly (vs.
The stall tests involve pilots intentionally reducing power to both engines and then recovering normal flight speeds in order to check that should a pilot encounter a stall during a flight, the aircraft will react benignly and allow for a smooth recovery.
Ten years ago, Superintendent Jerry Weast divided the system into the leafy "Green Zone," which he mostly (and benignly) ignored, and the struggling "Red Zone," where he poured new resources, staff, and "capacity." Test scores in the Red Zone are up, as is participation in Advancement Placement courses.
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These experts, whether they realize it or not, see government as the nanny who should benignly watch over us, making sure that we take care of ourselves for the good of society.
No longer a frightening catalogue of the wages of sin, Miao's foray into human foibles is benignly solipsistic, as if the medieval "chain of being" had at last collapsed into a funny farm of technical and biological cloning.
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John Dunlop is another in the 'grey and distinguished' bracket rather than a young thruster but he has never been afraid to embrace the new ways of the modern world - or at least to smile benignly on them, as he did when coming across Derek Thompson doing the full 'Tommo' act with a TV camera, a luxury Jaguar and a dozen female racegoers outside the weighing-room before the opener.
Chris said a further issue to remember is that capital is taxed a great deal more benignly than income at the moment and, for many, advancing capital as income would be attractive.
While the ad sounds benignly egalitarian, these groups are concerned with immigration, not providing sustainable sources of energy or quality health care, which would improve the relationship between population and environment.
with the rest of the vocabulary so they may rub benignly against each
Renata Lucas works on an institutional scale and with unmistakable institutional ambition, but like that of certain other Brazilian artists whose work has gained both critical traction and market currency in the US over the past decade--Cildo Meireles and Helio Oiticica, for example--some of Lucas's most provocative work is, owing to its benignly threatening nature, completely untenable in the context of a major American museum.