benign

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Related to benignity: longanimity

benign

 [be-nīn´]
not recurrent; favorable for recovery with appropriate treatment. The opposite of malignant.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·nign

(bē-nīn'),
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

benign

(bĭ-nīn′)
adj.
a. Having little or no detrimental effect; harmless: a benign chemical; benign indifference.
b. Of no danger to health; not malignant or disease-causing: a benign tumor.

be·nign′ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumour that does not invade or metastasise, for which surgical excision is curative.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

benign

adjective Not cancerous; not malignant; referring to a nonmalignant lesion or tumor that does not invade or metastasize, for which surgical excision is curative. Cf Malignant.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting the mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

benign

Not MALIGNANT. Mild, and of favourable outlook. Not usually tending to cause death. A benign tumour is a local growth, from an increase in the number of cells, which has no tendency to invade adjacent tissues or to seed out to remote parts of the body. Benign tumours are commonly enclosed in a definite capsule. They can, however cause trouble by local pressure effects, especially in confined spaces such as the inside of the skull.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

benign

nonmalignant, as of a growth.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Benign

In medical usage, benign is the opposite of malignant. It describes an abnormal growth that is stable, treatable and generally not life-threatening.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

be·nign

(bĕ-nīn')
Denoting mild character of an illness or the nonmalignant character of a neoplasm.
[through O.Fr., fr. L. benignus, kind]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Features associated with benignity include cystic or spongiform nodules as well as multiple nodules (without suspicious features) in an enlarged thyroid gland.
Coordinator of the IDP camp and staff of the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA), Mrs Bridget Ezonfada, who disclosed that there are over 2000 flood victims comprising children and adults, expressed gratitude to the Army for the benignity and selfless service for the nation.
[1] Although, its local behaviour is the antithesis of benignity, this tumour is not malignant for it never metastasises nor does it infiltrate adjacent tissues.
Against this background, 2 new markers have emerged that have molecular logic, and thus far, appear to have 100% specificity for separating benignity from malignancy.
Assuming the presence of calcification to be malignant will have a low PPV of 0% and sensitivity 0% and high specificity 90%, whereas taking the criteria for benignity will have a high PPV of 100% and specificity 100% and low sensitivity 21%.
Particularly, MnO and Mn[O.sub.2] nanomaterials have attracted great interest as anode materials in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for their high theoretical capacity, low cost, environmental benignity, and special properties [7-9].
The outcome variable was defined as malignancy based on histologic tissue analysis or benignity by radiographic stability or resolution over 2 years.
Encouraged by God, Who raises a crucifix from a blue cloud, Mary lifts a neckerchief from her small swollen breast; her plain, high-coloured features transfigured by her boundless benignity. The infant Jesus, with a gracious look, takes St Bernard's crosier whilst St Bernard, in his white gloves, joins his hands in prayer.
Even cop shows seem to flaunt the benignity of the city's ills: Unlike angst, alienation and anomie, murders and robberies can be solved, their perpetrators punished.
But perhaps the tallest, and most thoroughly discredited, tale told by plate glass is of man's power and nature's benignity. The promise of modernity was that we could master nature with our technology and science, and what better way to express that mastery--flaunt it, even--than building walls and houses made of glass?
Percy's subsequent utterances about his tubercular condition could be twisted to support the speculation: he always emphasized that, medically speaking, his contagion was very mild; he frequently stated that he was the happiest person ever to contract tuberculosis, for he was thus freed of the obligation to be a physician; yet, despite the benignity of his tuberculosis, the threat of its recurrence seemed to disturb him more than the actuality of the cancer which he knew to be fatal (p.
For incidental adrenal lesions measuring between 2 cm and 4 cm, dedicated adrenal CT or chemical shift MRI can be considered at the time of initial discovery to confirm benignity.